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A Couple Once Had Sex In MRI Machine For Scientific Purposes

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A Couple Once Had Sex In MRI Machine For Scientific Purposes

A couple had sex inside an MRI machine - shagging in the name of science.

Back in 1991 Dutch scientist Menko Victor 'Pek' van Andel wanted to see what went on inside our bodies while having sex - so enlisted the help of anthropologist Ida Sabelis and her boyfriend Jupp who offered to get it on inside the Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine.

MRI generate images of the human body using strong magnetic fields and radio waves and until Ida and Jupp hopped inside one in a lab in Amsterdam no one had ever seen what it looked like when two people had sex inside one.

Speaking to Vice, Ida revealed that she and her fella were initially asked to try and have sex in the missonary position but found it impossible so went for spooning instead.

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She told the publication: "It became pleasantly warm in the tube and we truly succeeded in enjoying each other in a familiar way." Fair enough.

Talking about how it felt to see the images, she added: "When I saw them it was just like, 'aww that's how we fit together'.

Credit: British Medical Journal
Credit: British Medical Journal

"They were beautiful! I could see my womb and then there was Jupp in a place that I knew from my own sensation, just below the cervix.

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"There was very clear features of both our insides, including the boundary between both our bellies. It showed so much detail it made me speechless."

Although Ida and Jupp were the first people to get frisky inside an MRI, they weren't the only ones to take part in the unusual project.

Between 1991 and 1999 eight couples and three single women also took part. However, Ida boasts that it was only her and Jupp who were able to take part without the use of Viagra.

Show off.

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Researchers referenced this illustration by Leonardo DaVinci. Credit: Royal Collection/BMJ
Researchers referenced this illustration by Leonardo DaVinci. Credit: Royal Collection/BMJ

She added: "For me, the experiment was also a testimony to mine and Jupp's happiness. I think that's something the paper missed: how connected a couple must be to perform under those kinds of conditions."

Although initially the study was rebuffed by various journals, it was finally published in the British Medical Journal in 1999 under the title Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Male and Female Genitals During Coitus and Female Sexual Arousal.

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And Ida says to this day it's still the most cited of all her work.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Weird

Claire Reid
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