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Animal Lover Recreates Life-Like Dead Pets For Grieving Owners

Animal Lover Recreates Life-Like Dead Pets For Grieving Owners

A dog lover is recreating deceased pets for their grieving owners as craft miniatures - which are so accurate you will struggle to work out which is the real dead dog and which is your new, permanent furry friend.

Pelin Gur, from London, devotes an entire week to recreate each dead pet in intricate detail using only photos sent to her from the heartbroken families.

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Nelly is one of the dogs Pelin has been tasked with recreating. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
Nelly is one of the dogs Pelin has been tasked with recreating. Credit: Kennedy News and Media

The 34-year-old swapped her nine-year career as a missiles engineer at a mechanical engineering plant in the Middle East for her dream as a felt artist.

When her husband Alaaddin Gur, 36, set up his own graphic design business in London last year, Pelin decided it was time to unleash her creativity.

Instead of applying for a new engineering job, Pelin launched her online store Jeje Felting that specialises in intricate needle-felted figures of people's pets.

Pelin always dreamed of being a felt artist. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
Pelin always dreamed of being a felt artist. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
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The adorable sculptures take a week to complete as Pelin likes to go over every detail of her reference photos to make sure she perfectly captures the character and 'story' behind each beloved pup.

Pursuing her dreams has been emotionally rewarding for Pelin particularly as many of her customers are bereaved dog owners who take great comfort from her canine creations.

Because why wouldn't you want to be reminded on a daily basis that your beloved pet is no longer with you?

Pelin also makes jewellery like these French Bulldog earrings. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
Pelin also makes jewellery like these French Bulldog earrings. Credit: Kennedy News and Media

Pelin, of Southwark, London, said: "To make the sculptures, people send me photos of their dogs and then I usually ask them questions to find out what they think is most special about their pet.

"It takes me a week to do each figure. I spend two days making it and then for the rest of the week I keep going back to it and going over the photos to make sure I got every detail. Every dog is so different which makes each figure a new challenge for me and I like a bit of a challenge.

"Usually they're made as dog memorials for people whose pets have died. It's really sad but it's nice to make them something to remember their love for their dog. After customers receive their felt sculptures, their reactions are priceless. There's so much love in my job.

Pelin's recreation of a dog called William who sadly died. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
Pelin's recreation of a dog called William who sadly died. Credit: Kennedy News and Media

"That's the real motivation for me, touching people's hearts. As long as the customer is happy that's what is important to me and makes this job so rewarding.

"Business is going well and there's usually a waiting list but I'm not concentrating on making money. I'm focusing on improving myself and bringing pet owners some joy.

"I have a dog and he's everything to me. He's like my son so I can understand the connection that each of my customers has with their pets. Dogs are such amazing creatures. We don't deserve them but thankfully we have them."

A Yorkshire Terrier brooch. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
A Yorkshire Terrier brooch. Credit: Kennedy News and Media

Before launching her company, Pelin did a four-month wet felting course and a one-day needle felting workshop then spent the next two years felting as a hobby and learning new skills at home.

Jeje Felting is named after Pelin and Alaaddin's five-year-old Jack Russell cross, Ceviz, who the couple affectionately call Jeje.

As well as figures of her customers four-legged friends, Pelin makes dog brooches, sculptures of people, wool paintings and jewellery.

While her artistic pursuits might seem miles away from her engineering background, Pelin actually finds there are many similarities between the two careers.

Pelin with Alaaddin and their pet pooch, Cevis. Credit: Kennedy News and Media
Pelin with Alaaddin and their pet pooch, Cevis. Credit: Kennedy News and Media

"As a part of mechanical engineering, I had to do designs and drawings. I had to have an eye for detail and be able to imagine what a design would look like in 3D. So it wasn't hard for me to use those skills to help me with needle felting and creating the sculptures.

"But during my time in engineering, everything was so analytical and a bit robotic but now I love being in communication with my customers and finding out about their pets.

"Every sculpture has its own story behind it and it feels like I'm making it for myself as much as I'm making it for the customer. It's very satisfying."

Featured Image Credit: Kennedy News and Media

Topics: News, Dog, Pets, Cat, Weird, Animals

Rebecca Shepherd

I'm Becky - a journalist at LADbible. I graduated with a First Class BA in Journalism before going on to cover criminal court cases, medical tribunals and breaking news for the national media - which inevitably and eventually became as glum as it sounds. Can often be found rocking a bag for life - which I made a 'thing' way before Rihanna. You can contact me at [email protected]

 

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