Advert

City Centre Bin Store Offered Up For Rent At £600 Per Month

Published 

City Centre Bin Store Offered Up For Rent At £600 Per Month

Good news for those looking to rent a property, because a city centre bin room in Manchester has come onto the market for £600 per month.

And even better news, the property appears to have no windows, as well as cupboards that appear to be made out of chipboard.

Of course, the world of house and flat renting is absolutely bizarre at the best of times, but this one really does knock most of the others into a cocked hat.

The property has been advertised on Rightmove and is described as a 'modern studio' that has been 'newly refurbished'.

Advert
Credit: Kennedy News & Media
Credit: Kennedy News & Media

All of those flowery real estate terms would seem to be carrying a lot of weight if you were to actually look at the listing.

First off, it's a pretty small property.

That's before you get to the fact that it used to be a bin room, appears to have no windows, and is next to the entrance of a car park.

Advert

According to the listing, the property boasts one bedroom, as well as a kitchen, bathroom, and shower.

The listing continues: "This would be the ideal home office for any working professional who wants to be located in the buzz of city centre, close to all amenities."

Luckily, Rightmove states that the flat will be available to those in receipt of housing benefits, as well as students, and a maximum of four tenants is recommended.

Credit: Kennedy News & Media
Credit: Kennedy News & Media
Advert

Weirdly, it seems as if the property is not being offered for residential purposes, as there seems to be no council tax to pay.

According to the Manchester Evening News, however, the building might still require a change of use approval, and planning officers will contact the owner.

It seems as if an application to Manchester City Council for change of use planning permission was refused in June.

They wanted to make the space a 'studio apartment', but the council said no.

Advert

Those who applied, Broompark Management, described the space as a 'vacant store' and maps stated that it was within the 'bin store area'.

Credit: Kennedy News & Media
Credit: Kennedy News & Media

In the covering letter for that application, they said that the studio would have new windows in to provide 'the living and sleeping space with excellent outlook and ventilation, addressing previous concerns elsewhere in the Green Quarter of overreliance on artificial lighting.'

"This helps to create a comfortable living area and sufficiently lit space," the letter continued.

Advert

The plans were refused because they would result in an 'unacceptable standard of living accommodation for the proposed occupants and would not have a positive impact on the supply of high-quality homes in this part of the city centre.'

Credit: Kennedy News & Media
Credit: Kennedy News & Media

They added: "Small windows would provide the only source of light and ventilation to the apartment, and the door and a window which is also located adjacent to the car park entrance would be particularly affected by noise, disturbance and fumes which would also contribute to the poor standard of accommodation.

"The proposal would therefore have an unduly harmful impact on residential amenity by not meeting the required standard of accommodation."

Featured Image Credit: Kennedy News & Media

Topics: UK News, Money, Housing, Manchester, Weird

Tom Wood
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Big Change To Testing After Holiday Could Come In As Early As Monday

4 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

Music Legend Meat Loaf Has Died Aged 74

2 days ago