Advert

Latest

an hour ago
Advert
6 hours ago
Advert

Most Popular

2 days ago
Advert

Ever Wondered How Much A YouTuber Earns?

Ever Wondered How Much A YouTuber Earns?

Being a YouTuber looks like a great job: you get paid money to make videos about whatever it is that you like doing anyway, while companies send you packs and packs of free stuff in the hope that you'll advertise it on your channel.

They're all living the life, dining out on other people's dime and taking money for old rope as 'influencers' to... influence, or something. Right?

Advert

Well, according to YouTuber Toobz in this new video, that isn't actually the case. In fact, far from it.

Toobz just hit 1m views and thought that it might be a decent time to check out just how much his hard work on YouTube has made him, over the 18 months or so that he's been on the platform. Turns out it's a pretty paltry $398.07 (£306) .

"I was expecting way more than this, what the hell happened?" he asks.

Well, what happened was a combination of factors, which he goes on to explain.

Advert

There was the so-called 'adpocalypse', which struck at the beginning of 2017, when Toobz began the channel.

That, for those of you who (unsurprisingly) don't follow the ins and outs of social media monetisation, was when YouTube decide the sent the majority of its ads to the most family-friendly channels - basically anything that the video streaming company decided was appropriate.

"Should YouTube decide that a video runs afoul of the site's age-appropriate tag, that video is immediately ineligible for pre-roll ads-which is YouTube's primary way to serve income to its creators," wrote tech blog Arstechnica at the time.

"YouTube could continue hosting the bazillions of videos being uploaded every minute and keep advertisers in a protective silo."

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Advertisers on YouTube had complained about having little control over the videos with which their ads were associated, so they made it all as vanilla as possible to compensate.

Then Toobz explains that he never did it for the money, so perhaps he hadn't monetised his own content as much as he might have - for example, by lengthening his own videos to include multiple breaks or product placements.

Interesting, his best video earned just 81 cents per 1,000 views, around half of what one might have to earn, while his worst got just 9 cents per 1,000. The last one was demonetised for content, though Toobz claims that he wasn't told about that.

Still, better than a smack in gob, right? Right?

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: News, World News, Interesting, Technology, YouTube

Mike Wood

Mike Meehall Wood is a freelance journalist and translator. He writes for LADbible, VICE and countless sports publications, focusing on rugby league, football and boxing. He is a graduate of Leeds University and maintains a fizzy pop obsession. Contact Mike at [email protected]

 

Next Up

Usain Bolt Makes His Professional Debut For Central Coast Mariners

Usain Bolt Makes His Professional Debut For Central Coast Mariners

a year ago