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​Police Called To Twitch’s Offices To Investigate Shooting Threat

​Police Called To Twitch’s Offices To Investigate Shooting Threat

Police were called to Twitch's San Francisco offices to investigate a threat made to the company on Twitter. Local police say there is no longer an "active threat" and it has been referred to their special investigations department.

"We were made aware of a threat against our San Francisco HQ on Tuesday, and have been working directly with law enforcement as they investigate," Twitch told Business Insider in a statement. "The safety and security of our employees is our top priority, and we are focused on ensuring this is resolved quickly and safely."

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Following the threat staff at Twitch's HQ were told they could work from home while police investigated.

During the investigation, police said "We don't have any suspect or know how credible the threat is at this time."

Just over a year ago, in April 2018, a shooter entered Google's offices and shot three people before killing themself. And in December, Facebook closed its offices in Menlo Park, California after a bomb threat was made against the company.

The threat against Twitter follows statements made by President Donald Trump on Monday in response to the mass shootings that took place in Texas and Ohio over the weekend. In his public response to those shootings he condemned video games for glorifying violence, partially blaming them for shooters in the US. He didn't take the opportunity to blame guns themselves.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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Twitch has been in the news before, not as the subject of threats but because the platform was used to make them. Over the past few years a practice called 'Swatting' has emerged, where people will call armed police to a home in the hopes they will assault a house while someone is streaming. Primarily the hope is that the police will disrupt the stream, but potentially to also harm the streamer or their family.

In one Swatting incident in 2017, not involving Twitch, father of two Andrew Finch was killed by police. Police were called to his home after 25-year-old Tyler Barriss rang 911 and claimed to live at Finch's address and told them he was holding the family there hostage. Barriss did this after being asked to by another gamer who was having an argument over a $1.50 wager in Call of Duty World War II. The gamer asked Barriss to Swat the other player, and he had the wrong address for the intended target, instead sending police to Finch's home.

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Topics: video games, Twitch, gamingbible, Amazon

Julian Benson

Senior journalist at GAMINGbible. Former deputy editor of PCGamesN and news editor of Kotaku UK. Written for Eurogamer, PC Gamer, Rock, Paper, Shotgun, Wired, and GamesMaster. Author of 'Rags, Bones and Tea Leaves'. Contact: [email protected]

 

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