It seems that everything is being condensed to be on your phone. We've got a number of apps that do our banking, breakdown cover, let us see a GP; realistically in the next few years we should be looking at Airplane Mode actually taking us abroad.

According to reports, the next thing to become available on smartphones will be driving licences, as the DVLA has trialed an app this month.

Following 'private staff testing' the app still has ways to go, meaning it won't be available to the public until next year, possibly in April.

For those who have become used to the physical copy of your licence, fear not, as the app won't replace them all together, they'll both be valid forms of ID. It's exceptionally good news for people who waste an awful lot of battery on nights out, as if their phone died they'd be fucked getting into clubs.

The 'quick, easy and secure' app allows you to access your information and licence when you're connected to the internet. Sounds similar to an actual diver's licence, which you don't need the internet for, either.

A statement from the DVLA said: "During 2017/18 we will be developing a quick, easy and secure service to allow customers to view a representation of their driving licence on their smartphone.

"The driver will be in control of their data and this can be used to share and validate driver information with trusted third parties through a secure website.

"The digital licence service will only be available to driving licence holders who have authenticated themselves on gov.uk through the existing driving licence service.

"This service will be available 24/7, wherever the driver has a web connection."

Credit: PA

There have been a number changes with regards to driving this year, mainly with driving tests. Later this year, learners will be tested on their sat-nav skills, as to keep them up to date with the modern way of driving.

Given the popularity and advancement of sat-navs, learners will be expected to use one efficiently, the Mirror reports. Probably an instant fail for screaming at it when it tells you to make a U-turn on a one way street and tells you to go 'straight on' down a cul-de-sac.

As if that wasn't enough of a panic inducer, other things will be added to the tests. Manoeuvres like three point turns, reversing around a corner and parallel parking will be replaced by things like reversing into a parking bay, something even some experienced drivers hate doing.

Independent driving will also be longer, and there'll be less instructions given with regards to directions.

Credit: PA

Transport minister Andrew Jones has said that these changes will help make our roads safer in the long run.

"We have some of the safest roads in the world but we are always looking to make them safer," he said. "These changes announced today will help reduce the number of people killed or injured on our roads and equip new drivers with the skills they need to use our roads safely.

"Ensuring the driving test is relevant in the 21st century, for example the introduction of sat navs, will go a long way towards doing this."

The last time such a big difference was made in driving tests was back in 1996, when theory tests were introduced. Ask your parents, they'll likely say something along the lines of "If I were to take a driving test today, I don't think I'd pass."

The changes will be put into motion on December 4, the Mirror reports. So, if you're learning, and can't be arsed with all this commotion, get it booked now.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Mark McGowan

Mark is a journalist at LADbible, who joined in 2015 after a year as a freelance writer. In the past he blogged for independent football fan channel Redmen TV, after graduating from Staffordshire University with degrees in journalism and English literature. He has worked on campaigns such as UOKM8? and IIOC.

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