• Home
  • News
  • Entertainment
  • LAD Originals

U OK M8?
Free To Be
Extinct
Citizen Reef

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK

Hidden underwater village seen for first time in 40 years as lake dries up

LADbible System Account

Published 
| Last updated 

Hidden underwater village seen for first time in 40 years as lake dries up

Featured Image Credit: Phil Blagg Photography

A previously hidden underwater village has been uncovered after Britain’s latest heatwave dried up the lake where it was submerged.

The village of Llanwddyn was seen for the first time in over 40 years as Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, Wales, evaporated to only 60 percent full. At this time of year, the reservoir is expected to be at around 90 percent capacity.

The picturesque location of this hidden village is in the centre of Wales, on the edge of the popular Snowdonia National Park. Llanwdynn was seen recently for the first time since an intense drought in 1976.

Walls of old buildings emerged when the lake dried up. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography
Walls of old buildings emerged when the lake dried up. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography

As a result of a recent barren spell, the foundations of old buildings, including houses, were re-discovered. Locals were also surprised to see old stone walls and even an old bridge.

History shows the village of Llanwdynn was quite unique. Villagers were forced to leave their homes in 1880 as the local authority wanted to construct a new reservoir. The aim was for the water in this new reservoir to supply the city of Liverpool, more than 100 miles north of the village.  

Locals were able to walk around the dry lake. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography
Locals were able to walk around the dry lake. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography

Authorities got their way, with homes and even the village’s old church being demolished. Other parts of buildings eventually sank, paving way for the new dam to be constructed. The first stone for the reservoir was laid by the Earl of Powis in 1881, marking the start of a huge undertaking.  

Apparently, around 1,000 men worked on building the new reservoir. A few homes were also built around the new water level. The reservoir was completed in 1888, and the valley surrounding it was flooded with water in 1989.

The remains of an old building that was once underwater. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography
The remains of an old building that was once underwater. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography

However, the recent heatwave has allowed the village to re-emerge after so many years.

It is hoped a heavy rainfall is coming later this week in the region that will allow Lake Vyrnwy to increase closer to the 90 percent capacity it should be around this time of year. Last year’s figures show the reservoir dropped to 77 percent at its lowest, an astonishing 17 percent higher than what it is currently.

The lake should be 90 percent full at this time of year. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography
The lake should be 90 percent full at this time of year. Credit: Phil Blagg Photography

Wales recently record its hottest day ever with the Met Office. On July 18, Gogerddan near Aberystwyth recorded a record 35.3°C. England beat that record with 40.3°C in Coningsby, Lincolnshire last month. Meanwhile, Scotland’s highest temperature recorded by the Met Office is 34.8°C in Charterhall on the Scottish borders.   

Topics: UK News, Weather

LADbible System Account
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

London Marathon runner dies after collapsing on 23rd mile

9 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Police commissioners calling for cannabis to be made Class A drug

5 hours ago