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Neurosurgeon explains what porn does to a man’s brain

Neurosurgeon explains what porn does to a man’s brain

Dr Andrew Huberman is an acclaimed Stanford neuroscientist who has given his thoughts on pornography

With an abundance of content online, porn is a bigger part of people's lives than ever before.

And now, a top neurosurgeon has offered a stark warning for those who consume is regularly. Check out what he's got to say:

Dr Andrew Huberman - an acclaimed Stanford neuroscientist - has shared his thoughts on what the possible dangers are, 'especially for young kids who are consuming a lot of pornography'.

Speaking on a podcast with YouTuber Chris Williamson, the doctor explained how not all 'pornography is bad' but how it is consumed can negatively affect a person's sex life due to its impact on arousal.

"There are good data to support the idea that if your brain learns to be aroused by watching other people have sex it is not necessarily going to carry over to the ability to get aroused when you're one-on-one with somebody else, right," he said.

"Especially young kids who are consuming a lot of pornography, the brain is learning sexual arousal to other people having sex."

YouTube/Chris Williamson

"And you know, here I'm approaching this only through the lens of biology, right," the doctor added.

"I'm not a, you know, I'm not a psychologist and I'm certainly not political in it in any way, at least not, I have ideas about politics but I just don't discuss them publicly.

"But the idea here is that, you know, I'm not saying pornography, as a stimulus, is bad or good, what I'm saying is in its availability and its extreme forms it's a very potent stimulus and very potent stimuli of any kind - extremely palatable food, extreme pornography, extreme experiences, like bungee cord jumping - those set a threshold for dopamine release.

"The higher the dopamine peak the bigger the drop afterwards and it's not that you drop to baseline you drop below baseline."

YouTube/Chris Williamson

This comes after it was revealed that traffic to porn sites spiked during the pandemic.

Pornhub alone enjoyed a 24.4 percent rise in its global traffic when lockdown began in the UK in March 2020 - in Great Britain alone, traffic rose by 26.9 percent.

Martin Preston - the founder and CEO of Delamere, a residential addiction centre in the UK - told LADbible that this sudden and prolonged surge has led to a rise in the number of people now suffering from sex addictions.

"It is on the rise," he told us. "We've seen an uptick in the number of inquiries, number of admissions throughout lockdown, when people were home working and there was more temptation, 'My colleagues not looking over my shoulder, I'm not in an open office'.

"So home working being on the rise during lockdown, and obviously people spending more time at home, many people turned to pornography out of boredom in the first instance."

He went on: "Throughout lockdown, people were lonely, and often, when we work with somebody for sex addiction or pornography, it tends to be that what they are lacking is intimacy.

"It's not necessarily sexual intimacy, it can be more about relationships that they don't feel, you know, seen or heard in their relationships."

Featured Image Credit: YouTube/Chris Williamson

Topics: Sex and Relationships, News