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Drivers Can Face £1,000 Fine or Month In Jail For Commonly Broken Speed Camera Rule

Lisa McLoughlin

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Drivers Can Face £1,000 Fine or Month In Jail For Commonly Broken Speed Camera Rule

Drivers have been reminded of a commonly broken rule of the road, that might be seen as helpful to other motorists, but could land you in hot water with the law.

The stark reminder comes after a driver in Wales posted the location of a speed camera van on Facebook and was urged to take it down by other users, according to North Wales Live.

Not only that but the gentleman had posted a photo of the mobile speed trap while driving, which is another potential driving offence.

Drivers can face jail time if they share the location of speed cameras. Credit: Pixaby
Drivers can face jail time if they share the location of speed cameras. Credit: Pixaby

Drivers could face up to a month in jail or a fine of as much as £1,000 for warning other motorists of the location of mobile speed cameras on social media.

Authorities have warned that posting messages on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to alert others can be viewed as a criminal offence – and you could be prosecuted for it.

In light of the incident, North Wales Police said that if you warn others about mobile speed camera vans you could be in breach of section 89 of the Police Act 1997.

Part of the section reads: "Any person who resists or wilfully obstructs a constable in the execution of his duty, or a person assisting a constable in the execution of his duty, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one month or to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale, or to both.”

A spokesperson for the force’s policing unit added: “Publicising the locations of speed traps hampers the good work that staff and officers do to reduce speeding motorists, which is one of the ‘Fatal Five’ offences.

"Motorists could be prosecuted if they are caught warning other drivers on the road for any speed trap."

However, authorities may use their discretion as to whether to pursue a case as the locations of mobile speed camera vans are often given in advance by police.

Credit: Alamy
Credit: Alamy

Not only is sharing the location of a speed camera van an offence but flashing a driver to warn that there are ones up ahead is another potential breach traffic laws.

According to rule 110 and 111 of the Highway Code, motorists can only flash their headlights to let other drivers know they are on the road too – and drivers should never 'assume' that flashing headlights mean you can 'proceed'.

Rule 110 states: "Only flash your headlights to let other road users know that you are there."

While rule 111 continues: "Never assume that flashing headlights is a signal inviting you to proceed. Use your own judgement and proceed carefully."

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

Topics: UK News, Cars, News

Lisa McLoughlin
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