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Fresh Loch Ness Monster sighting after new webcams fitted over lake

Megan Walder

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Fresh Loch Ness Monster sighting after new webcams fitted over lake

Featured Image Credit: Eoin Fagan/Visit Inverness Loch Ness

New cameras installed at Loch Ness have captured fresh 'evidence' that a horrifying beast is lurking in the lake.

You can judge for yourself just how convincing the new footage is here:

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Since as far back as 564 BC, people have been convinced some kind of cryptid is lurking at the bottom of Loch Ness.

Previously, monster hunters had to turn up in person to see if they could spot the creature, but that all changed this month when Visit Inverness Loch Ness installed new cameras around the lake.

This means Nessie hunters can now scan the waters from the comfort of their own homes by watching the livestream, and now one cryptid enthusiast claims he's come up trumps.

In footage captured on the new webcams, Eoin Fagan spotted a long, black object moving in the lake. Could the shape, the only darkened spot within the loch at the time of the sightings, really be Nessie?

That you Nessie? Credit: Eoin Fagan/Visit Inverness Loch Ness
That you Nessie? Credit: Eoin Fagan/Visit Inverness Loch Ness

O'Fagan told the Daily Record: "I captured two very interesting video clips on two of the new webcams recently.

"The first at the Clansman webcam Loch Ness at 20.13pm on September 6, is of a water disturbance, and a long dark shape which was recorded for 4 minutes, and was the only darkened water visible in the recording of the loch in that time."

The other clip was captured on 6 September on the Shoreland Lodges webcam and shows a shape 'in the region of 6 to 8 feet long, like an eel, or rather a very large or giant one'.

It's interesting it looked like an eel, as scientists have previously speculated that the creature in Loch Ness could be a giant eel.

Professor Neil Gemmell, a geneticist from New Zealand's University of Otago, told the BBC back in 2019: "There is a very significant amount of eel DNA. Eels are very plentiful in Loch Ness, with eel DNA found at pretty much every location sampled - there are a lot of them. So - are they giant eels?"

Whatever it is that's lurking in Loch Ness, you'd think O'Fagan would be rushing to submit his video evidence to the appropriate authorities, reserving his spot in the history books as the man who proved Nessie's existence.

It's not that simple though, and the official protocol must be followed.

The new webcams mean the possibilities for new sightings are endless. Credit: Eoin Fagan/Visit Inverness Loch Ness
The new webcams mean the possibilities for new sightings are endless. Credit: Eoin Fagan/Visit Inverness Loch Ness

Unluckily for O’Fagan and all of those who wish to submit findings from the webcams, they cannot be the ones to report the discovery.

Visit Inverness Loch Ness, the owners of the cameras, must be the ones to submit the footage to The Official Loch Ness Monster Sightings Register. Once clarified, the captured footage will be officially recorded amongst other evidence of the beast’s existence.

In the meantime, he simply has to wait.

Whilst the inability for those watching via the webcams to report the sightings themselves is disappointing, the existence of them opens exciting possibilities. Fans now have the ability to monitor the loch 365 days a year, and the possibilities of future Nessie sightings are infinite.

Topics: Conspiracy Theory, Technology

Megan Walder
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