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TV Presenter Dies While Trying To Break British Land Speed Record

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TV Presenter Dies While Trying To Break British Land Speed Record

A driver who died while trying to break the land speed record has been named as TV presenter and ultra-speed racer Zef Eisenberg.

Eisenberg, 47, was killed yesterday at Elvington Airfield, in York while trying to break the 207mph record.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Elvington is the former RAF airfield that Top Gear's Richard Hammond was seriously injured when the jet-powered car he was piloting crashed at 319mph.

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Emergency crews attended after receiving reports of a 'serious collision' at approximately 4.30pm on Thursday.

The BBC reports that his family confirmed the death.

North Yorkshire Police said an investigation into the crash was ongoing.

As well as running Madmax Race Team - which attempts to break speed records - Eisenberg called himself a 'Speed Freak'. He holds a number of British and world land speed records

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He also holds the Guinness World Record (two way average in a mile) for the fastest turbine-powered motorbike at 225.4 mph and naked motorbike (no fairing) in Britain - also at 225.4mph.

Another of his records include riding the world's fastest turbine bike after he hit 234mph.

Eisenberg was formerly a competitive body builder and became a millionaire after he founded and ran a sports nutrition company called Maximuscle.

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A man of many talents, he also had a run as a TV presenter, hosting ITV4 series, Speed Freaks The Bike Show and also appearing on other shows.

Eisenberg's final social media post showed Porsche Sand Racer being refuelled, which was put up with the caption: "Late night testing....for the next stage of MADness...."

He added: "After it's 239.6mph run at Vmax, let's turn up the boost and see what the beast can deliver... updates to follow."

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He added: "After it's 239.6mph run at Vmax, let's turn up the boost and see what the beast can deliver... updates to follow."

Speaking previously to motorbike publication Goodwood Road and Racing, Eisenberg spoke about what it feels like to do such high speeds.

He said: "At 234mph it was still accelerating. Rapidly. But we were running out of runway, and I couldn't hold on any longer. It took me three years of gym work to get to that speed. At 220mph the disc on my vertebrae was popping out. There's so much force being put on the neck."

His team installed a strap from the helmet to a harness around his groin so that his neck didn't bend backwards and snap.

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He added: "That allowed me to increase the speed without my neck compressing and popping out a disc each time. It's not for the faint of heart."

Featured Image Credit: Facebook

Topics: UK News

Amelia Ward
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