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Australian Lab Is Looking For Applicants To Test Potential Coronavirus Vaccine

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Australian Lab Is Looking For Applicants To Test Potential Coronavirus Vaccine

An Australian laboratory is looking for a bunch of human guinea pigs to trial a potential coronavirus vaccine.

Perth-based Linear Clinical Research believes it has a 'ground-breaking' vaccine on its hands and will need willing participants to see whether it truly works.

It's been a hard fought journey for the lab to get to this place with the COVID-19 S-Trimer and they're very excited after receiving funding to embark on this critical stage.

Linear chief executive Jayden Rogers said in a statement: "This is one of the most prominent trials globally and involves some of the most renowned vaccines companies.

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Credit: PA
Credit: PA

"The fight against COVID-19 requires a global effort bringing together the best science and innovation.

"We are fortunate to be one of the few countries in the world to still be offering functional clinical trial facilities because we do not have large volumes of COVID-19 cases as compared to other parts of the world."

The trial will run for two months and if it's successful then it could be expanded to a global study to see if it works.

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If you're keen to throw your hat in the ring, register here.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

There are dozens of trials, studies and investigations being undertaken across the globe at the moment to find a vaccine for the coronavirus.

The first European human trial of a coronavirus vaccine got underway in Oxford late last week, where two volunteers were injected - the first of more than 800 who have been recruited.

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Volunteers will be given one of two vaccines, but only doctors will know which has been administered.

According to the BBC, half of the people signed up for the study will receive the Covid-19 vaccine, while the other half will be given a control vaccine, which protects against meningitis but not coronavirus.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The team will be able to determine whether or not the vaccine works by comparing these two groups of people over the coming months, to see who becomes infected.

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Elisa Granato, one of the two who received the injection, told the BBC: "I'm a scientist, so I wanted to try to support the scientific process wherever I can."

The team in Oxford had already developed a vaccine against Mers, another type of coronavirus, using the same method - which has involved a vaccine made using a weakened version of a common cold virus from chimpanzees.

A larger trial of around 5,000 volunteers is expected to begin at some point in the near future, with no age limit.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: covid-19-positive, News, Coronavirus, Australia

Stewart Perrie
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