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Thousands Line Up To Climb Uluru As October 26 Deadline Looms

Thousands Line Up To Climb Uluru As October 26 Deadline Looms

Shocking video has emerged on social media, showing thousands of people lining up to climb Uluru in the Northern Territory.

It seems like droves of people are flocking to the sacred Aboriginal site to scale the rock before it becomes illegal later this month.

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The video, which appeared on Reddit, shows massive amounts of people at the base of the rock and many more slowly making their way to the top.

Climbing Uluru has become a contentious topic over the past few months, with loads of people politely requesting that people don't do it and a loud minority of others who think they should be allowed to.

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson is one of the latter and not only believes it's her birthright to climb the rock, but it also should stay open to bring in tourist dollars.

"We've got nearly 400 people employed there; 38 percent are Aboriginal, they're employed there, and Torres Strait Islanders," she told Channel 9.

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"The fact is, it's money making, it's giving jobs to the Indigenous community, you get four to five thousand tourists a year that want to go there and climb the rock.

"It's no different to saying we're going to close down Bondi Beach because there are some people there that have drowned. How ridiculous is that! This is an iconic site for all Australians.

"I can't see the cultural sensitivity when people have been climbing the rock all these years and now all of a sudden they want to shut it down? No, I just don't get it, I really don't get it."

Whether she likes it or not, the rock will be closed to tourists on October 26 and it'll cost you a pretty penny if you're caught scaling it.

The massive sandstone rock formation in the Northern Territory is important to the Pitjantjatjara Anangu people and forms part of their understanding of how the world was created.

Credit: Reddit
Credit: Reddit

For years people have been told not to climb the site because it's viewed as a desecration of a precious site - but tourists have done it anyway.

According to Parks Australia, 'park rangers and wardens are able to issue infringement notices in accordance with the EPBC Regulations for suspected contraventions of the Regulations', once the ban comes into effect.

If you're caught then you can be fined up to 20 per cent of the maximum penalty that a court could impose for a similar offence.

Funnily enough, people also reckon that climbing the rock isn't really all that good.

One person on Reddit wrote: "I went to Uluru two years ago and chose not to climb it. As our guide so wisely said, the rock is what you've come to see, in the middle of nowhere. All there is to see from the top is the nothing that surrounds."

Featured Image Credit: Reddit

Topics: News, Australia

Stewart Perrie

Stewart Perrie is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. His first job was as a newsreader and journalist at the award winning Sydney radio station, Macquarie Radio. He was solely responsible for the content broadcast on multiple stations across Australia when the MH17, Germanwings and AirAsia disasters unfolded. Stewart has covered the conflict in Syria for LADbible, interviewing a doctor on the front line, and has contributed to the hugely successful UOKM8 campaign.

 

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