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Twin Baby Born In Amniotic Sac In Extremely Rare Birth

Twin Baby Born In Amniotic Sac In Extremely Rare Birth

WARNING: CONTAINS GRAPHIC (BUT PRETTY COOL) CONTENT

Amazing images show a baby in Brazil that was born inside the amniotic sac - an extremely rare event that occurs in just one in 80,000 births.

The baby's mother gave birth to twins Brayan and Emanuel at a hospital in the southern Brazilian city of Criciuma on 5 November.

Often twin births involve a caesarian section, and the amniotic sac is broken.

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Credit: Newsflash
Credit: Newsflash

However, the twins' mother Keila Barbon Henrique not only gave birth vaginally, she also did so with Emanuel still inside the liquid-filled amniotic sac.

Despite being very rare, births like Emanuel's are not dangerous.

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Keila and the baby's father, Gilmar Concatto da Silva, live in the neighbouring municipality of Forquilhinha.

Credit: Newsflash
Credit: Newsflash

Brayan was born weighing 2.546kg (5.613lbs) and measuring 44cm (17.3in), while Emanuel - the younger twin by nine minutes - weighed 2.346kg (5.172lbs) and measuring 44.5cm (17.5in).

Emanuel was removed from the transparent membranes by the medical team.

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The mother and twins are all doing well, according to doctors at the hospital.

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Credit: Newsflash
Credit: Newsflash

Last year, similar images surfaced that showed another baby delivered while still inside his amniotic sac.

The little boy was delivered by caesarean section at 36 weeks in Fuzhou, Fujian, East China, weighing 2.5kg (5.5lbs).

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Medics at the Fujian Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital said they decided to deliver the baby while in the sac - also known as 'en caul' - during an emergency C-section in July this year after discovering that the baby was in the breach position.

The boy didn't breathe on his own for around two minutes after he was delivered, until doctors cut the protective sac open.

Doctor Pan said: "Newborns usually cry shortly after being born as their respiratory system is introduced to the new surroundings.

"But when this boy was born, still in his amniotic sac, it was as if he were still in his mother's womb.

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"It was not until doctors opened the membrane and cleared the amniotic fluid from his respiratory system that he began to cry - a full two minutes later than normal babies."

The baby boy seemed perfectly content inside the amniotic sac. Credit: AsiaWire
The baby boy seemed perfectly content inside the amniotic sac. Credit: AsiaWire

Doctors decided to deliver the baby due to various complications, including the infant being in breach position and a condition called velamentous cord insertion, which means the umbilical cord doesn't attach in the centre of the placenta as it should.

Doctor Pan continued: "We opted for this procedure because preterm babies are weaker than full-term babies.

"As premature births are among the main reasons for infant mortality, an en caul birth allows the newborn to be delivered inside the same protective membrane.

"This reduces moisture loss on the skin, avoids rapid temperature loss after a preterm birth, and decreases the risk of the infant being harmed during a C-section.

"Even if an en caul delivery were unsuccessful, the baby could then be delivered via a traditional C-section, so it's just one more option to have."

Featured Image Credit: Newsflash

Topics: World News, News

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Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at [email protected]