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Metal detectorist discovers a 460-year-old ring that contains a mystery message

Metal detectorist discovers a 460-year-old ring that contains a mystery message

Experts believe it could be part of treasure hidden by the Sheriff of Nottingham.

A metal detectorist has dug up an ancient posy ring believed to have been hidden centuries ago.

Andy Taylor discovered the almost 500-year-old ring on farmland in Nottingham, right near Sherwood Forest, in 2020.

The posy ring, a popular 16th-century love token, weighs around 15g, with the mystery message ‘I Meane Ryght’, enscribed on the side.

Experts believe it could be part of treasure hidden by the Sheriff of Nottingham or a family member.

SWNS

Andy discovered the jewellery just before his friend Graham Harrison uncovered a signet ring believed to belong to the former sheriff.

The ring bore the crest of the Jenison family, who served as High Sheriffs of Nottingham hundreds of years ago.

Sir Matthew Jenison was in charge of looking after the trees of Sherwood Forest centuries ago.

Legend has it that Jenison came from an affluent family who accumulated wealth from valuables left in their safekeeping during the Civil War that were never reclaimed.

The posy ring will go under the hammer at Hansons Auctioneers in Etwall, Derbys, later this year for around £2,000-£3,000 (AUD $3,980-5,970).

SWNS

Andy says he stumbled across the item during a metal detecting club event on farmer’s land at Radcliffe-on-Trent in Rushcliffe, Nottinghamshire.

“It was so hot, I decided to go back to my car to fetch my drink. I was lucky. Just as I turned back, I picked up a lovely strong signal,” he said.

"I dug a divot in the sandy soil and there was the ring, just looking at me.

“It was an exciting find. When that signal goes off you never know whether it will be a ring-pull or ancient treasure.”

He added that he’s 95 per cent sure both the rings he and Graham found belonged to the same person.

The plot thickens..

"It’s the second largest ring of its type ever seen according to a report I received from the British Museum,” he added.

“I have never sold any of my metal detecting discoveries before but if I don’t part with the ring it will just be stuck in a pot forever with my best finds.”

Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers, therorised that perhaps the ring was a gift to mark ‘high status’ and would be ideal for a couple's engagement ring.

"The messages inscribed inside were a secret to all but the wearer and giver, so we can never be certain what ‘I Meane Ryght’ meant to the owner of the ring," he said.

“Its weight indicates its owner was wealthy. It was likely given as a token of love or esteem nearly 500 years ago.”

He added: "For any lover of history, it has to be the ultimate gift.”

Forget Tiffany's.

Featured Image Credit: SWNS

Topics: News, World News