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Fresh hope to solve Malaysia Airlines MH370 mystery as scientists propose ambitious plan

Fresh hope to solve Malaysia Airlines MH370 mystery as scientists propose ambitious plan

Flight MH370 has been at the centre of several conspiracy theories since it went missing in 2014

Over the years there have been a number of attempts to find the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines MH370, which disappeared on 8 March, 2014 with 239 people on board.

While the final audio from the cockpit is known and some parts of the wreckage have washed up to shore, the location where the plane went down is still a mystery.

Many groups have been part of attempts to locate the missing plane, with some saying they'd found new evidence that could help point towards the whereabouts of the aircraft.

It is still not known why the plane deviated from its course and we may never know, but that hasn't stopped people from attempting to work out new ways to find the plane.

Robots, radio technology and many other methods have been employed as part of the search, but in the vacuum of concrete information some people have developed their own theories as to what happened.

Over 10 years on and people still don't know what happened to their loved ones. (Supian Ahmad/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Over 10 years on and people still don't know what happened to their loved ones. (Supian Ahmad/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

One team of scientists from Cardiff University believe they might have something that could help, as research from them shows that signals captured on underwater microphones could be part of a plan to locate MH370.

The researchers indicated that violent ocean impacts such as plane crashes produce distinct signals which travel through the water.

Hydrophone technology on the seabed can record these signals, and the scientists believe that can give them a clearer idea of where MH370 went down.

"Our analysis shows clear pressure signals from previous aircraft crashes were detected on hydrophones, even at distances exceeding 3,000km," Cardiff University's Dr Usama Kadri said.

“In the case of MH370, official investigations concluded the aircraft must have crashed near the 7th arc – the point at which the last communication between the plane and INMERSAT occurred."

Some parts of the plane have been found, but most of the wreckage is still unaccounted for. (MOHD RASFAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Some parts of the plane have been found, but most of the wreckage is still unaccounted for. (MOHD RASFAN/AFP via Getty Images)

He said that more research would be needed, but their study has recommendations for anyone looking for MH370 about where they ought to begin the search.

They suggest a series of controlled explosions or airguns should be used, with the signals produced then monitored by nearby equipment.

Dr Kadri said that such experiments could 'significantly narrow down, almost pinpoint, the aircraft’s location'.

However, he also spoke of caution as he warned that should the signals be unrelated then it would mean authorities needed to 'reassess the time frame or location established by their official search efforts to date'.

With over a decade having passed since the plane's disappearance there are still efforts being made to track down MH370 and those who lost their lives on board.

Featured Image Credit: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty/Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images

Topics: MH370, Science, World News, UK News