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McDonald’s flipped iconic sign upside down to make powerful statement

McDonald’s flipped iconic sign upside down to make powerful statement

The move was made to raise awareness on a special day

Virtually everybody is familiar with the famous golden arches of McDonald's.

They symbolise a lot of different things for a lot of different people.

For many, they're a symbol of western capitalism and culture, for others, they're a signal of hope as you're being driven home by your parents only to be told that 'there's food at home'. Truly gutting.

Either way, the logo is known the world over.

It's been through a few variations since it was first designed in 1962, but the arches have stayed in place.

The golden arches were flipped upside down to make a statement.
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

However, it was subject to some alterations in the interest of taking a stand.

The fast food chain flipped its iconic arches upside down to make an important statement.

McDonald's has long prided itself on helping women in the work place, with six out of ten of its US managers being women.

So starting in 2018 on International Women's Day, McDonald's made a big gesture to acknowledge women's contributions.

In 2018 and 2019, the burger chain flipped its M upside down to create a W.

The change was undertaken at a California restaurant but was shared across social media and even appeared on t-shirts, hats and packaging at 100 American outlets.

McDonald's chief diversity officer Wendy Lewis said the flip was meant to honour women everywhere and within the company.

Many fans took to X at the time to express their support for the initiative.

One wrote: "Happy International Women’s Day! Love this from Mcdonald’s!"

The golden arches were flipped upside down to make a statement.
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Another joked: "Quick shout out to @Wendys for supporting International Women’s Day every day."

However, others weren't as keen on the move.

Laura Parker, who was the national coordinator for Labour pressure group Momentum, branded it 'McFeminism'.

On X, another critic wrote: "How much did this sign swap cost? How is that helping women? Cheaper than traditional advertising is likely the real deciding factor."

McDonald's wasn't the only big company to make a change to acknowledge International Women's Day in the past.

Johnnie Walker released a limited edition 'Jane Walker' bottle, with $1 from each sale going towards to charities benefiting women.

Brawny also launched a 'Strength Knows No Gender' campaign which featured women taking the place of the brand's 'Brawny Man'.

It also donated $100,000 to Girls, Inc., a non-profit which helps young women learn leadership skills.

Are you lovin' McDonald's statement about women?

Featured Image Credit: Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Topics: Food And Drink, McDonalds