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British conspiracy theorist responsible for 'lizard monarchy' banned from most of Europe

Daisy Phillipson

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British conspiracy theorist responsible for 'lizard monarchy' banned from most of Europe

British conspiracy theorist David Icke has been banned from most of Europe for two years ahead of a planned demonstration he was set to attend.

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For those not in the know, the former footballer is famed for popularising the reptilian conspiracy theory, which suggests shapeshifting reptile-like aliens control society by taking on human form and gaining political power.

On Sunday, 6 November, Icke was scheduled to appear at the latest Samen voor Nederland (Together for the Netherlands) protest and speak against the Ukraine war, the Dutch government and rising energy prices.

As well as moving the demonstration from Dam Square to the Museumplein as there is more space, the cabinet has now banned Icke from entering the entire Schengen Area, which comprises 26 EU countries including the Netherlands.

A translated copy of the letter sent to Icke has been published on his website, which starts by informing him of the two-year ban.

Listing its reasons for the move, the Dutch immigration services state: "Given the reactions from society, it is not inconceivable that the arrival of David Icke at the 'Samen voor Nederland' demonstration will lead to a disturbance of public order.

The conspiracy theorist was set to attend the Samen voor Nederland over the weekend. Credit: Twitter/Samen voor Nederland
The conspiracy theorist was set to attend the Samen voor Nederland over the weekend. Credit: Twitter/Samen voor Nederland

"Based on the media attention and the reactions from both sides, his arrival is the centre of attention for both supporters and opponents."

Amsterdam authorities expressed fears that Icke's appearance could cause unrest, even if he only speaks via live stream.

Elsewhere in the letter, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (IND) outlines the Center for Information and Documentation Israel's (CIDI) response to the fact that Icke was booked as a speaker for the event.

It states: "He [Icke] claims that the Jews financed Hitler and that the Jews are responsible for organising the 2008 financial crisis and the terrorist attacks on September 11.

"The CIDI has responded to Icke’s planned arrival and has announced in the mainstream media that it finds it unacceptable that a stage is being given to Icke."

Although the Netherland government's Ministry of Justice has confirmed the ban to local press after the letter was published on 3 November, no further statements have been made at this time.

LADbible has contacted the Ministry of Justice and Security for comment.

In 2020, Icke's Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accounts were banned or removed for 'violating policies' around 'Covid misinformation'.

The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) spoke in favour of the move after Icke's YouTube page was deleted.

Icke has been banned from a number of social media platforms in recent years. Credit: Sipa US/Alamy Stock Photo
Icke has been banned from a number of social media platforms in recent years. Credit: Sipa US/Alamy Stock Photo

"Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, Icke has used your platforms to spread dangerous conspiracy theories and medical misinformation to his audience of millions of followers and subscribers," it said at the time.

"The potentially harmful claims he has made include denying the existence of Covid-19; linking the current crisis to 5G mobile technology; suggesting that Jewish cultists are behind the crisis; that viruses cannot be transmitted through direct physical contact or intermediary objects; and that people with healthy immune systems are safe from contracting the virus.

"Videos of Icke making these claims have been viewed at least 30 million times."

Featured Image Credit: Mark Thomas / Kevin J. Frost / Alamy

Topics: Conspiracy Theory, World News

Daisy Phillipson
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