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Chinese Company Unveils Bodysuit Design That Can 'Kill' The Coronavirus

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Chinese Company Unveils Bodysuit Design That Can 'Kill' The Coronavirus

As fears of contracting the coronavirus escalate, many are looking at ways to ensure they don't become infected.

Some are pouring anti-bacterial hand soap on their bodies every time they touch something, many are choosing to wear face masks, and others are taking it a bit further.

But one Chinese architecture firm is upping the ante by designing a bodysuit that they say can kill the virus. Penda China unveiled its proposal on social media, saying it took inspiration from the way a bat looks

Credit: Penda China/Instagram
Credit: Penda China/Instagram
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"As an architect, I have designed a wearable space device that can effectively isolate us outdoors to ensure safety," the post said.

"The ultraviolet radiation network on the surface of the device can heat up to sterilise the surrounding environment, turning contact a way to kill, rather than spread, the virus.

"The device is also foldable, ready to open automatically when we need to contact with the outside world. The design follows the bionic design principle, taking bats as the prototype.

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"When we were little, we all dreamed to be a Batman, a hero who fights evil and save the world. Perhaps that dream is coming true today."

Penda is an architecture design studio that was founded in 2013 and is lead by co-founder Sun Dayong. Whether this ends up becoming a reality is anyone's guess but just from looking at the design it's hardly going to be affordable.

But people have already been wearing much more basic versions of this batsuit.

Several people have posted photos online of people covering their heads with plastic bags, bottles and motorbike helmets in an attempt to keep the virus at bay.

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In one photo, a family of four can be seen in an airport queue wearing plastic bags over their bodies - risking potential suffocation. A couple was seen on a flight from Sydney to Hamilton Island wrapped in plastic to ensure the virus doesn't enter their bodies.

Interestingly, face masks aren't that amazing at keeping viruses out.

Dr Jake Dunning, head of emerging infections and zoonoses at Public Health England, told the BBC: "Although there is a perception that the wearing of facemasks may be beneficial, there is in fact very little evidence of widespread benefit from their use outside of these clinical settings."

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Dunning said the masks have to be worn correctly, changed frequently and disposed of safely if they are to work properly.

Featured Image Credit: Penda China/Instagram

Topics: News, Interesting

Stewart Perrie
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