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People All Around The World Are Getting Sick From The 'Super Cold' That Isn't Covid-19

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People All Around The World Are Getting Sick From The 'Super Cold' That Isn't Covid-19

Just as life post-lockdown was beginning to get back to normal and Covid-19 fears were fading, a new virus is running rampant around the world - but it isn't the one we've heard all about for the last two years.

People around the globe are falling prey to a 'super cold', which bears very similar symptoms to coronavirus.

Many have rushed to get tested as the virus shares similar symptoms to the coronavirus - such as a sore throat, headaches, body aches, runny nose, and fatigue - but test results repeatedly come back as negative for Covid-19.

Those infected with the 'super cold' do not lose their sense of taste or smell, but are still warned to get tested for coronavirus due to the shared symptoms.

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Aussies are being struck down by a 'super cold' that has the same symptoms to Covid-19. Credit: Nancy Beijersbergen/Alamy
Aussies are being struck down by a 'super cold' that has the same symptoms to Covid-19. Credit: Nancy Beijersbergen/Alamy

Similar cases were reported in the UK last year after the country lifted lockdown regulations, with experts reporting the monster bug is likely the result of years of lockdowns and social distancing.

"It could well be that now common colds are resurging, because of the decline in social distancing and mask wearing, that they are bouncing back and the respiratory tract has not had enough recent experience of respiratory infections to be able to mount that strong first line defence," Prof Peter Openshaw, at Imperial College London, explained to The Guardian.

Now the bug seems to have made its way Down Under, as Covid-19 restrictions start to scale back across the nation.

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Sydney GP Dr Charlotte Hespe said Australia is ripe for a major cold and flu outbreaks after years of isolation.

"We are seeing more of these upper respiratory tract infections," Dr Hespe told Daily Mail Australia.

Those with the 'super cold' are experiencing Covid-19 symptoms, but returning negative tests. Credit: catwalkphotos/Alamy Stock Photo
Those with the 'super cold' are experiencing Covid-19 symptoms, but returning negative tests. Credit: catwalkphotos/Alamy Stock Photo

"To diagnose flu, you need a fever and headache as well as some respiratory symptoms such as the sore throat or nose and cough - but you might not get those.

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"It's predominantly often those more systemic symptoms of being unwell with fever, headache, aches and pains and feeling miserable. Recovery is 10-14 days."

Deakin University chair of epidemiology Professor Catherine Bennett warned that the flu may also kill more people than Covid this year, due to 'less immunity against the flu now because we've skipped two flu seasons'.

"You might see fewer coronavirus deaths in winter because vulnerable people are actually more vulnerable to flu," she said.

With international travel back on for Australia, this also means that travellers are bringing new viruses Down Under that Aussies haven't developed an immunity against.

Featured Image Credit: Anton Estrada/Mark Phillips/Alamy Stock Photo

Topics: News, Coronavirus, Australia, Health, Covid-19

Rachel Lang
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