Advert

Morrisons Explains Why It's Scrapping 'Use By' Dates On Milk

Published 
| Last updated 

Morrisons Explains Why It's Scrapping 'Use By' Dates On Milk

Morrisons is set to scrap 'use by' dates on its milk.

From the end of this month (January), the supermarket giant will replace the 'use by' date with a 'best before' date on 90 percent of its cartons.

It's hoped that the move will prevent millions of litres of milk from being wasted, with 490 million pints reportedly being poured away unnecessarily every year.

Customers will instead be advised to use the 'sniff test' the check whether or not their milk has turned sour.

Advert

Morrisons is the first supermarket in the country to drop the 'use by' date on its products.

Credit: Alamy
Credit: Alamy

Speaking about the decision, Ian Goode, senior milk buyer at Morrisons, said it was a 'bold step' but one that needed to be taken.

He said to ITV News: "Wasted milk means wasted effort by our farmers and unnecessary carbon being released into the atmosphere.

Advert

"Good quality well-kept milk has a good few days life after normal ‘use by’ dates – and we think it should be consumed, not tipped down the sink.

"So, we’re taking a bold step today and asking customers to decide whether their milk is still good to drink.

"Generations before us have always used the sniff test – and I believe we can too."

'Use by' dates can vary from product to product, and some milk may be ok to use for a few days after the recommended date.

Advert
Credit: Alamy
Credit: Alamy

According to sustainability charity Wrap, around 85 million pints of milk waste are believed to be the result of people following the 'use by' labels strictly.

Marcus Gover, of Wrap, said: "I am delighted that Morrisons is the first UK supermarket to take this important step to help reduce household food waste – it shows real leadership and we look forward to more retailers reviewing date labels on their products and taking action."

Now, while we're on the topic of milk, how about we address the age old question: before or after water when making a brew?

Advert

Professor Alan Mackie, from the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds University, has said those living in hard water areas should add the milk before the boiling water to improve the taste. 

Credit: Alamy
Credit: Alamy

Professor Mackie explains: "Flavour by and large is produced by the different compounds in tea including tannins in particular. 

"The more minerals present in water the more difficult it is for these compounds to develop the flavour - resulting in the dull cuppas you get in hard water areas.

Advert

"Making tea the traditional way - steeping a bag in hot water before removing it and adding milk - results in the tannins turning into solids before they can develop the flavour properly.

"But, if the milk is added at the start of the steeping process then its proteins can bind to the tannins and other minerals in the water -preventing them from turning solid - which in turn gives you a far superior flavour."

Featured Image Credit: Morrisons

Topics: Food And Drink, UK News

Dominic Smithers
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Entertainment

Tom Hardy Says He Was 'Really Overweight' When He Played Bane

21 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

Music Legend Meat Loaf Has Died Aged 74

3 days ago