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Remains Of Medieval Humans Found During Archaeological Dig

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Remains Of Medieval Humans Found During Archaeological Dig

Human remains from the Medieval period have been uncovered during an archaeological dig.

The bones reportedly date back as far as 1300 and were found just outside South Leith Parish Church in Edinburgh.

According to reports, previous research into the area found evidence of a medieval graveyard that extended across the road from the site, with 10 bodies already having been dug up and part of a cemetery wall found.

It comes as planned work continues on extending the city's tramlines.

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Speaking about the incredible discovery, local authority leader Cammy Day said she was amazed.

She said: "This is an extremely fascinating, essential part of the broader project to bring the tram to Newhaven, shedding some light on centuries of history here in Leith.

Archaeologists have found 10 bodies at the site in Edinburgh. Credit: PA
Archaeologists have found 10 bodies at the site in Edinburgh. Credit: PA

"It's crucial that we conserve the remains found here and a team of archaeologists are carrying out the painstaking job of doing this.

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"What's more, further examination of the excavated graves will give us an invaluable glimpse into the lives of Leithers past."

Experts leading the dig believe the remains that have been exhumed date between 1300 and 1650, and they will now be analysed to find out more about the living conditions and health of people at the time.

The find comes as work moves ahead on construction work between Elm Row and Crown Place, as part of plans to extend the city's tramlines an extra three miles to connect Leith and Newhaven.

It's believed the remains date back between 1300 and 1650. Credit: PA
It's believed the remains date back between 1300 and 1650. Credit: PA
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Transport convener Lesley Macinnes said: "The Trams to Newhaven project is now up and running again and progressing well, as the main works get under way on Leith Walk.

"This element of the scheme is just as important as track-laying or landscaping and allows us to conserve a small piece of the area's heritage for generations to come."

Another notable archeological find in the past few years has been the discovery of penis-shaped amulets that Ancient Romans armed themselves with to stave off illness and bad luck.

The bizarre pieces would be worn around people's necks or hung up in the family home in an attempt to safeguard against anything untoward.

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According to expert Anthony Philip Corbeill, who spoke to Atlas Obscura, the amulets have been found by archaeologists around the world, including in Italy and Israel.

Corbeill explained that back in the olden days the folks who wore the flying d***s believed they would be given 'divine power'.

He added: "The sexual energy of the phallus was tied directly to its power in reproduction."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: UK News, History

Dominic Smithers
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