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The dark meaning behind 'Barbie Girl' by Aqua

Callum Jones

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The dark meaning behind 'Barbie Girl' by Aqua

There's no denying that 'Barbie Girl' by Aqua is an all-time classic, and it never fails to brings lots of childhood memories for many now-fully grown adults.

Whenever the iconic doll was discussed, the song would always come to mind and talked about at some point.

But while it was a very innocent song as a child, it turns out there's actually a completely different meaning as an adult.

If you go ahead and read the lyrics of the 1997 classic, the once innocent childhood song has a pretty dark meaning.

So, for all those Barbie and Ken lovers, prepare for your perception to be drastically changed.

Following a short introduction between Ken and Barbie and wanting to go for a ride, the song continues: "I'm a Barbie girl, in the Barbie world. Life in plastic, it's fantastic.

"You can brush my hair, undress me everywhere. Imagination, life is your creation."

Right, so this is a bit disturbing.

Barbie is presumably talking to Ken, and good for her if she is. But let's not forget this is a kid's song, and Barbie is telling Ken to 'undress her everywhere'.

Think of all the billions of kids around the world singing 'undress me everywhere' - yikes.

'Barbie Girl' by Aqua suddenly has a very different meaning now we're all grown up. Credit: Aqua/YouTube
'Barbie Girl' by Aqua suddenly has a very different meaning now we're all grown up. Credit: Aqua/YouTube

If the song wasn't as popular and such a pop anthem for so many kids, it possibly wouldn't be as bad - but this song sits at over a billion views on YouTube and over 300 million streams on Spotify.

Anyway, the next part of the song: "I’m a blond bimbo girl in a fantasy world.

"Dress me up, make it tight, I’m your dolly. Kiss me here, touch me there, hanky panky."

Well, the use of the word 'bimbo' is problematic enough in itself, and the less interpretations we can make about the second line the better.

Next up, Barbie sings: "Make me walk, make me talk, do whatever you please. I can act like a star, I can beg on my knees."

For those who haven't caught on yet, Barbie is essentially saying that Ken gets whatever he pleases.

Barbie and Ken have some questionable lines to each other in the song. Credit: Aqua/YouTube
Barbie and Ken have some questionable lines to each other in the song. Credit: Aqua/YouTube

So, I think we can see why that line should not be allowed in a kid's song.

Ken then joins in the fun: "Come jump in, bimbo friend, let us do it again. Hit the town, fool around, let’s go party."

Bimbo friend? No words.

And the final lyric we are looking at is: "You can touch. You can play."

If we've just ruined your childhood, all we can do is sincerely apologise.

Featured Image Credit: Aqua/YouTube

Topics: Music

Callum Jones
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