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Glastonbury 2023: Will The Festival Be On Next Year?

Sarah Cayless

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Glastonbury 2023: Will The Festival Be On Next Year?

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

Due to COVID-19, Glastonbury had to be cancelled in both 2020 and 2021. Last year, it was turned into a virtual event, where artists such as Coldplay, HAIM and Wolf Alice performed on live stream. 

The decision to cancel, though unavoidable, left thousands of music lovers disappointed. With tickets rolling over from the two cancelled years, it was even harder than usual to get a place at this year’s festival. Therefore, many are now desperate to know whether the festival will go ahead next year.

Who Makes The Decision On Whether Glastonbury 2023 Will Go Ahead?

English dairy farmer Michael Eavis is the co-creator and boss of Glastonbury, so he, and his family, who work together to organise the event, dictate how the festival is run. However, as it is on a farm, nature also has a say. Every five years, Glastonbury has to take a break in order to allow the land to recover. 

The good news is that it has now been officially confirmed that Glastonbury will go ahead in 2023. As if that wasn’t exciting enough, all three headliners have also now been booked

When asked in an interview with High Profiles how he chooses the headliner, Eavis explained that he makes the decision alongside 12 other people, including his daughter. Though he admitted that he essentially just chooses the artists he likes best. 

When Did Glastonbury Festival Begin?

The first Glastonbury took place in 1970, back when it was called the 'Pilton Pop, Folk and Blues Festival' and 1,500 attendees. Those who attended back then had to pay £1 for the admission fee, and in exchange were given some free milk and space to camp.

These days, some 200,000 attend the festival. However, while Glastonbury is almost unrecognisable now compared to how it began 50 years ago, some things have remained the same. 

Take, for example, the Pyramid Stage. First built in 1971 out of scaffolding, metal and plastic sheets, it continues to be a central part of the festival. It has been rebuilt twice, most recently in 2000, and has had everyone from The Rolling Stones to Beyonce perform on it. 




Topics: Glastonbury, Music, Festivals

Sarah Cayless
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