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Wicklow Might Have The World's Weirdest Sculpture Park

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Wicklow Might Have The World's Weirdest Sculpture Park

Wicklow is a lot of things. Beautiful, if you're talking about the mountains, slightly tacky if you're talking about Bray. Well, if you're looking for a combination of both, then you could do a lot worse than Victor's Way, close to Roundwood.

It's amazing that it isn't better known. Though, of course, Victor's Way is currently closed, it hasn't exactly gone out of its way to become known, which is strange because it is amazing and totally strange at the same time.

Built as the brainchild of a German called Victor Langheld, who travelled the world, engaged with several religions and then decided to make a tribute to all of them in the countryside in Wicklow.

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The park website describes itself as "A contemplative space for adults (and not a fun park for families)" which is probably for the best, because some of the statues are pretty terrifying. Check out this one that was photographed and posted to Instagram by user donkeysbazooka.

The website, which is well worth a look because it looks like it dates from about 1999, adds that "parents are discouraged from bringing their children. But if they do, children go in free." Now, if it were my aul Da, I can guarantee that the "free" aspect would greatly outweigh the "please don't bring them though" bit.

"Victor's Way was designed as a contemplation (or meditation) space for adults between the approx. ages of 28 and 65 who feel the need to take some quality time out for R&R&R (i.e. rest, recovery & spiritual reorientation)," says the site, and obviously that weird language is all their own. "Since it started in 1996 Victor's Way has evolved as a Pantheist monastery (more precisely in Hinduspeak as a Brahmanashram)."

"Ideally chatty companions, children and dogs, all of which disrupt the serenity of the contemplative ambience, should not be brought. Here the use of mobile phones (save for photography) is a no-no."

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"Ideally the visitor should walk alone, slow down to half speed and therefore experience twice as much. Ideally the visitor should sit down on the benches and forest recliners provided and absorb into his or her inner (future, hence perfect) world and/or the serene forest atmosphere and contemplate the wider canvas of life."

It does come across as quite pushy for somewhere in the pursuit of zen, but it's their gaff, their rules. Maybe it's Victor's Way or the highway.

Topics: Ireland

Mike Wood
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