• Home
  • News
  • Entertainment
  • LAD Originals

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK
Advert
Advert
Advert

Loading…

Mystery of 'Flying Tiger' flight which went missing with 107 people on board still unsolved 60 years later

Harley Young

Published 
| Last updated 

It's been 60 years since an aircraft with 107 people on board went missing without a trace.

The Flying Tiger Line Flight 739 was en route to Saigon as part of a secret mission during the Vietnam War.

The flight would never reach its destination and no one knows where the aircraft's wreckage is located - becoming one of the biggest aviation mysteries to happen in the Vietnam War era.

Some of the many faces of those lost on the fateful flight. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News
Some of the many faces of those lost on the fateful flight. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News
Advert

Hardly anything is known about what happened to FTLF 739 on 16 March 1962, and the names of those who were sadly lost on the flight have not been added to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C.

A private citizen, Morrill Worcester, decided to erect a monument to honour the names of those lost on his land in Columbia Falls, Maine.

“When I first heard the story about this mission, I was shocked to learn that nothing has been done for these families,” said Worcester.

“I said that day, that we would do something to make sure these people are honoured and remembered, and to hopefully give some closure to these families."

Advert

This is the only monument that currently pays its respects to those lost. However, the families of those that disappeared are trying to right that.

Jennifer Kirk, niece of Army Specialist Donald Sargent, one of the passengers. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News
Jennifer Kirk, niece of Army Specialist Donald Sargent, one of the passengers. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News

“There’s nothing, no trace of anything,” said Jennifer Kirk, niece of an Army Ranger on board the flight on that fateful day when it went missing.

“They’re being pushed aside to be forgotten. That’s incomprehensible. They can’t be forgotten.”

Advert

Jennifer Kirk goes on to explain how her uncle was chosen by 35th US president John F. Kennedy to be on the special mission as 'part of an elite team'.

Army Specialist Donald Sargent, one of the passengers lost on the flight. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News
Army Specialist Donald Sargent, one of the passengers lost on the flight. Credit: YouTube/Click on Detroit/Local 4 News

In an interview with Local 4 News Detroit, Jennifer shares the heartbreaking story of how her uncle was reluctant to leave for the mission and kept coming back to hug his family before saying he had to go and didn't know when he would be back.

Little did they know that would be the last time they would see each other.

Advert

Jennifer went on to explain how, for the sergeant's mother, the news of the missing plane was 'too much'.

"She'd never accepted it. For the full time, from that moment until she passed, she always swore that he was coming home," Jennifer said.

Topics: US News

Harley Young
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Community

Groom plays video of bride 'cheating on him' to entire room at wedding

5 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Elon Musk is working on 'game plan' to get one million people to Mars

2 days ago