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Dental Hygienist Shares Scary Reason Why You Should Never Eat Ice

Jess Hardiman

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| Last updated 

Dental Hygienist Shares Scary Reason Why You Should Never Eat Ice

It may be tempting to crunch down on a refreshing piece of ice, but a dental hygienist has revealed why that's probably not the best idea.

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New York-based hygienist Avalene (@avalene.r) regularly shares TikTok videos about dental tips and facts, having recently posted one about what can happen when you eat ice.

She urged people not to chow down on chunks of ice, explaining how there are risks involved.

Avalene said: "When you eat ice, you risk cracking and chipping your teeth. 

"Please do not eat ice."

Many people flocked to the comments section after watching the video, with some saying it had happened to them.

One wrote: "Yeah guys don't try this it happened to me."

Someone else said: "That happened to me but I still eat ice."

Others admitted it would be a difficult habit to kick - one person commenting: "But it’s so good I’m sorry."

Another asked: "I let it melt is that good in stead of biting?"

Credit: TikTok/@avalene.r
Credit: TikTok/@avalene.r

According to Medical News Today, eating ice is ‘not usually dangerous’ but can lead to a risk of dental and oral issues. 

“Consuming a lot of ice can damage tooth enamel and cause cracks or chips in the teeth,” the site explains. 

“This can lead to further problems, such as increased sensitivity to temperature and oral pain. 

“In one case report, doctors related that a person who had chewed 30 ice cubes or more each day for over 20 years — using the teeth on the left side — experienced changes in the jaw and cavities on that side only. 

“People who continually chew ice may need dental work for cavities, including replacing lost fillings.” 

Other issues people might face include ‘anemia complications’, ‘dietary problems’ and ‘other pica complications’ - pica being an eating disorder in which someone eats items not typically thought of as food and do not contain significant nutritional value. 

Credit: Alamy
Credit: Alamy

The site added how sucking on or chewing ice in moderation is 'unlikely to cause harm', but that a 'compulsion to eat ice' may require medical attention - and that if ice cravings last for longer than one month, you should visit your doctor to investigate the underlying cause.

"If a pregnant woman experiences ice cravings, she should consult a doctor right away, because the pagophagia can indicate anemia," it said.

"The doctor will order a blood test and may prescribe iron supplements."

Featured Image Credit: TikTok/@avalene.r

Topics: TikTok, Health

Jess Hardiman
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