• Home
  • News
  • Entertainment
  • LAD Originals

U OK M8?
Free To Be
Extinct
Citizen Reef

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK

Greta Thunberg says she has daily ‘laughing attacks’ and says her Asperger’s helps her see through ‘bulls**t’

Claire Reid

Published 
| Last updated 

Greta Thunberg says she has daily ‘laughing attacks’ and says her Asperger’s helps her see through ‘bulls**t’

Greta Thunberg has challenged the perception that she’s an ‘angry teenager’ and says those closest to her know differently. 

The 19-year-old climate change activist surprisingly rose to fame when she was a schoolgirl and became the face of school strikes.

Thunberg has said becoming a climate change activist has given her life ‘purpose’ and ‘something to do’ - but her approach has prompted some to believe she’s constantly angry.

Greta Thunberg in 2019. Credit: Franz Perc / Alamy Live News.
Greta Thunberg in 2019. Credit: Franz Perc / Alamy Live News.

Former US President Donald Trump once sarcastically tweeted that the teen ‘seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future’ after seeing part of an impassioned speech she gave at a climate change summit. 

However, in a new interview with Elle, Thunberg has spoken about her ‘angry’ image and how it’s not at all accurate. 

“People seem to think of me as an angry teenager,” she told the publication. “They obviously haven't met me. At least two or three times a day I get laughing attacks where I can't breathe. It can be anything. If I’m in a room with people, they suddenly realise I’m not breathing and ask me if I’m OK and it’s because I can’t stop!”

Credit: Stig Alenäs / Alamy Stock Photo
Credit: Stig Alenäs / Alamy Stock Photo

Over the years, Thunberg has spoken at numerous climate change events including the 2019 UN Climate Action Summit, which was attended by politicians from across the globe. 

The teen reckons her Asperger’s Syndrome helps her quickly get to the truth of the matter and cut through the soundbites often given by politicians when it comes to climate change. 

She said: “It’s helped me see through a lot of the bulls**t because they say, ‘Oh yeah, we’re not in line with the Paris Agreement so far, but at least we’re taking small steps in the right direction.’

Greta Thunberg spoke at Glastonbury this year. Credit: JEP Live Music / Alamy Stock Photo
Greta Thunberg spoke at Glastonbury this year. Credit: JEP Live Music / Alamy Stock Photo

"Some people might see that as though we’re trying, but I see it as we’re so far away from what we need to be doing for even the bare minimum.” 

The activist, who is releasing The Climate Book this month, said her key point is that people shouldn’t listen to her (which is somewhat ironic considering she often gives speeches to an audience), but instead believe in the experts - something that has been a constant theme of the past couple of years. 

She said: “Listen to the scientists, listen to the experts, listen to those who are most affected.

“I could talk about all these things, but I am a privileged white person who lives in Sweden. I don't really have any story to tell, so it's up to others who need to be heard to [talk about] these things.”

Featured Image Credit: Franz Perc / Alamy Stock Photo / BBC

Topics: Greta Thunberg, Global Warming

Claire Reid
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Company fined £120,000 after builders caught being lifted in digger bucket

an hour ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Furious shoppers call out The Range for 'degrading' and 'sexist' bottle opener

2 hours ago