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Law Change Could See Motorists Faced With £70 Fine For Pavement Parking

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Law Change Could See Motorists Faced With £70 Fine For Pavement Parking

The government has confirmed it will be investigating the possibility of banning pavement parking across England.

The Department for Transport (DfT) initially suggested the law change two years ago, but it has now been confirmed that the issue will be addressed as part of a wider traffic law review, which is expected to be completed later this year.

The Transport Committee launched an inquiry into pavement parking yesterday (Tuesday), and the chair, Lilian Greenwood, said the aim was to ensure the streets are safe for pedestrians.

Parking on the pavement could be banned across England. Credit: PA
Parking on the pavement could be banned across England. Credit: PA
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She said: "This is an area where some people's actions cause real difficulties for others. Parking on pavements risks the safety of all groups of people from the littlest to the oldest, with differing needs.

"While we're also inquiring into active travel - how we get more people to get into walking and cycling - we need to make sure it's safe to take to the streets.

"We want to hear from the public about the difficulties this presents and the solutions on offer."

If implemented, the law could allow councils to fine motorists parked on kerbs £50 or £70, according to The Times.

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The idea is that it will reduce obstructions for pedestrians who are blind, or use wheelchairs or mobility scooters.

It has been illegal to park on the pavement in London since 1974, however, individual councils can seek exemptions. Outside of the capital, people are currently allowed to partially park on the pavement, as long as their vehicle is not causing an obstruction.

It has been illegal to park on the pavement in London since 1974. Credit: PA
It has been illegal to park on the pavement in London since 1974. Credit: PA

Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation, the motoring charity, said pavement parkers need to consider the impact they might have on pedestrians.

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According to the Daily Mail, he said: "Motorists thinking that they're doing their fellow road users a favour by parking up on the pavement should also have an eye to the people whose paths they might be blocking, particularly in built-up areas where thoughtless parking can mean wheelchair users and parents with prams or buggies have to contend with motor traffic."

However, there are many who are opposed to a blanket ban, as in many areas the roads would become impassable if vehicles didn't park on the pavements; this could present a particularly serious problem should roads become blocked to emergency service vehicles.

Edmund King, president of the AA, is one of those who is opposed to a total ban.

According to the Daily Mail, he said: "There are some streets that are so narrow that if cars park on both sides it wouldn't allow emergency vehicles or bin lorries to get through.

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"We would be concerned if there was a blanket ban because it is clearly possible in some areas to park on the pavement while still allowing room for pushchairs or people in wheelchairs to pass."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: uk news, Roads, Cars

Jake Massey
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