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Support for Australia becoming a republic has fallen after the Queen's death

Rachel Lang

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| Last updated 

Support for Australia becoming a republic has fallen after the Queen's death

Featured Image Credit: PA/Alamy. REUTERS / Alamy.

Australians are turning away from the notion of becoming a republic in the wake of Queen Elizabeth II's death.

A new Guardian Essential poll could dash the glimmer of hope for the Australian republican cause.

A mere 43 per cent of Aussies want to split from the Commonwealth, a number far lower than the 50 per cent minimum majority required in a referendum to succeed.

However, the number of Aussies who wish to retain British rule has risen.

King Charles III at the casket of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II. Credit:  PA Images / Alamy Stock Photo
King Charles III at the casket of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II. Credit: PA Images / Alamy Stock Photo

That number has risen by three percentage points since June; the last time support for an Australian republic was gauged.

Polling, which was taken shortly after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, could be a strong indication that folks Down Under aren't ready for Ausxit yet.

More men than women would like to see an Aussie republic (52 per cent of men and 35 per cent of women). Younger Aussies are also more supportive of a republic (51 per cent) and those aged 35-54 are also keen for change (46 per cent for compared to 34 per cent against).

For those aged 55 and over, 51 per cent of people are opposed to Australia becoming a republic, however support for change only sits at 34 per cent.

So that is still a significant chunk of 'grey area' across demographics, which doesn't bode well for Aussie Prime Minister Anthony Albanese.

Albanese hasn't raised the topic in the wake of the Queen's death out of respect, but he has previously made his intentions to create an independent Australian state quite clear.

Tweeting from London where he attended the Queen's funeral, Albanese did say that it was 'a privilege to be part of the Australian delegation and a witness to history'.

"The funeral service was in that same noble spirit. Representatives from around the world joined the Royal Family and the British people in giving thanks for The Queen’s life and her example, saluting her devotion to duty, faith and family," he said on Twitter.

The Queen and then-Prince Charles, June 2022. Credit: REUTERS / Alamy.
The Queen and then-Prince Charles, June 2022. Credit: REUTERS / Alamy.

The Australian Prime Minister, clearly in a contemplative mood, added that he was 'deeply moved by the quiet solidarity of the thousands of people who had queued through the night to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II'.

The Aussie PM added: "All walks of life, united in their grief and gratitude."

That being said, the Guardian Essential poll did indicate that Aussies were reluctant to have King Charles III as the nation's head of state.

Just 44 per cent of those surveyed gave the 73-year-old King a 'positive rating'.

Comparatively, the late Queen had a 71 per cent approval rating and Prince William came in at 63 per cent. Yikes.

So what is next for Australia? Who knows, but it'll be an interesting one to watch.

Topics: Australia

Rachel Lang
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