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£283 Anti-5G Product Turns Out To Be A £5 USB Drive

£283 Anti-5G Product Turns Out To Be A £5 USB Drive

A device sold for £283 ($346) that is supposed to protect people from the 'negative effects' of 5G signals seems to be no different to a regular 128MB USB stick that could be bought for about £5 ($6), according to tech experts.

One of the weirdest things about this coronavirus pandemic - and there have been a few ones to choose from - has been that some people have blamed the whole thing on 5G.

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Just the other week, anti-lockdown protesters bore slogans decrying the rollout of 5G, which hasn't even happened outside of urban areas yet, and transmitter towers - sometimes not even 5G ones - have been the target of attacks.

Now, it looks as if some people are trying to capitalise on people's fears about the new technology.

That's where the 5G BioShield comes in.

Here's the BioShield website. Credit: 5G BioShield
Here's the BioShield website. Credit: 5G BioShield

It's advertised as a device to protect from 5G, and was recommended by a member of the 5G Advisory Committee of Glastonbury Town Council, which has also called for an inquiry into 5G.

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However, despite one of their nine members - Tony Hall - saying: "We use this device and find it helpful," it doesn't seem as if there's actually that much to it.

Ken Munro, from Pen Test Partners - a company that tears down products to look for security issues - reckons that this device is just the same as a common-or-garden USB drive that you can buy from China for a fiver.

He told the BBC: "So what's different between it and a virtually identical 'crystal' USB key available from various suppliers in Shenzhen, China, for around £5 per key?"

He concludes that the difference appears to be a sticker. It's not even a special 5G-repellent sticker, either.

There's that sticker. Credit: Pen Test Partners
There's that sticker. Credit: Pen Test Partners

Munro added: "Now, we're not 5G quantum experts but said sticker looks remarkably like one available in sheets from stationery suppliers for less than a penny each."

A post on the Pen Test Partners website continued: "A review of the stick's properties revealed nothing more that what you'd expect from a regular 128MB USB key.

"We weren't even sure that 128s are still in production!

"Digging further into the device, there appeared to be no electrical or other connections between the device and the 'sticker' and also no additional components other than the USB stick."

They concluded: "In our opinion the 5G BioShield is nothing more than a £5 USB key with a sticker on it.

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"Whether or not the sticker provides £300 worth of quantum holographic catalyzer technology we'll leave you to decide.

"We do not believe this product should be promoted by publicly-funded bodies until a full, independent, peer-reviewed scientific study has been undertaken on its effectiveness.

"We think trading standards bodies should investigate this product."

So, how is it supposed to work?

Well, according the website: "Through a process of quantum oscillation, the 5G BioShield USB key balances and re-harmonises the disturbing frequencies arising from the electric fog induced by devices, such as laptops, cordless phones, Wi-Fi, tablets, et cetera."

The experts found nothing special about the device, other than the price. Credit: Pen Test Partners
The experts found nothing special about the device, other than the price. Credit: Pen Test Partners

They're selling it for £283, or £795 for three. A bargain, given the supposed intricacy of the technology.

The company that sells these, BioShield Distribution, said they don't make the devices or own the product, but is the sole worldwide distributor.

One of the directors, Anna Grochowalska, told the Beeb: "We are in possession of a great deal of technical information, with plenty of back-up historical research.

"As you can understand, we are not authorised to fully disclose all this sensitive information to third parties, for obvious reasons."

Seems legit.

Would you pay £283 for this? Credit: Pen Test Partners
Would you pay £283 for this? Credit: Pen Test Partners

She also rejected the idea that selling a five quid USB stick for almost £300 was unreasonable.

She continued: "In regard to the costs analysis your research has produced, I believe that the lack of in-depth information will not drive you to the exact computation of our expenses and production costs, including the cost of IP [intellectual property rights], and so on.

"It is therefore hard to take your evaluation seriously, since you have evidently not researched the background facts in any meaningful way."

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Featured Image Credit: Pen Test Partners

Topics: UK News, Technology

Tom Wood

Tom Wood is a LADbible journalist and Twin Peaks enthusiast. Despite having a career in football cut short by a chronic lack of talent, he managed to obtain degrees from both the University of London and Salford. According to his French teacher, at the weekends he mostly likes to play football and go to the park with his brother. Contact Tom on [email protected]