To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

100ml liquid rule u-turn across UK airports brings summer holiday chaos worries

100ml liquid rule u-turn across UK airports brings summer holiday chaos worries

Airports across the United Kingdom have brought in expensive new scanners to put the 100ml liquid rule to bed

There are worries that UK airports could be subjected to months of chaos and confusion as a result of a last-minute u-turn on the 100ml liquid rule when travelling.

Airports across the country have been going through a slow revolution of security standards, with an aim to put an end to the 100ml limit placed on liquids at security check.

Under new regulations brought in by the government, airports across the UK have until June 2025 to install hi-tech scanners at security check.

This will put an end to the 100ml cap and instead mean travellers can carry up to two litres in their hand luggage.

The 100ml rule is changing forever - but just not yet (Getty Stock Images)
The 100ml rule is changing forever - but just not yet (Getty Stock Images)

It'll also mean goodbye to the 20cm by 20cm clear, plastic bags we've had to stuff our liquids in to, with the new scanners allowing the liquids to be scattered around our luggage.

The same goes for laptops, iPads and tablets, with them eventually allowed to be left in your luggage.

Many of the UK's airports have already brought in the new scanners, with the original deadline for them being two and a half weeks ago on June 1, 2024.

It meant millions of Brits could gear up for a summer of flying with less rules, restrictions, and ultimately headaches.

But for London City, Aberdeen, Newcastle, Leeds/Bradford, Southend and Teesside airports - despite the new scanners - the 100ml remains.

That's due to the government reintroducing the 100ml cap at the six airports as of 9 June, with the Department for Transport saying: "This temporary move is to enable further improvements to be made to the new checkpoint systems and will only affect a small number of passengers.

An end to 100ml liquid limits is on the way (Getty Stock Images)
An end to 100ml liquid limits is on the way (Getty Stock Images)

"For most passengers, security measures will remain unchanged. Passengers should continue to check security requirements with their departure airport before travelling."

But the issue has lead to industry worries for the summer months, with the u-turn coming as millions more head to the country's airports to fly abroad.

Karen Dee, chief executive of the Airport Operators Association - the trade association for all UK airports - said it brings 'uncertainty' in the busiest time of the year where airports with the new tech will have prepared resources for life under the new technology.

"These latest changes announced on Friday, instigated with very little notice, have created uncertainty for passengers just as airports enter their busiest periods of the year," Dee said as per The Independent.

“It has also put airport operators in a challenging position, with very limited time to prepare for the additional staffing and wider resources that this will require, and no clear idea of when this issue will be resolved."

Will long airport queues return as a result? (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Will long airport queues return as a result? (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

A Department for Transport spokesperson said: “The temporary reintroduction of the 100ml liquid restriction at some airports is to allow time to further improve systems.

"It only affects those travelling from six regional airports where next generation security checkpoints (NGSC) were already in full operation – around six per cent of all UK air passengers.

"For most passengers, security measures will remain unchanged from those in place since 2006. Passengers should continue to check security requirements with their departure airport before travelling."

Those travelling from Birmingham Airport, which also has the new scanners, have been told by airport bosses to keep following the 100ml cap due to the 'new Government Directive that has been issued nationwide across all ports'.

Heathrow Airport has said it will not have the scanners ready until the summer of 2025, with Manchester Airport expected to follow suit.

Featured Image Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images/Getty Stock Images

Topics: Travel, UK News, Holiday, World News, Europe, Politics