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Two-second fan trick could help you sleep much better as temperatures soar

Anish Vij

Published 
| Last updated 

'Bloody hell, it’s like a sauna in here' is what Brits up and down the country will be saying as the UK is currently getting slapped with 30 degrees heat.

Without doubt, the best thing about the warm weather is that it seems to bring out a completely new population of people who are suddenly in a brilliant mood.

Barbecues, paddling pools, overpriced suncream, the stuff of dreams.

However, the worst part about the heat is tossing and turning, trying to get a good night's sleep.

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A health warning has been issued to parts of the UK amid the current heatwave. Credit: Pexels/Isaac Garcia
A health warning has been issued to parts of the UK amid the current heatwave. Credit: Pexels/Isaac Garcia

Thankfully, there's this two-second fan trick could help.

All you need is a fan and a window.

Yep, the trick is very simple, almost too good to be true, and it makes more sense than stuffing your duvet into the freezer - how big are these freezers?

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All it involves is spinning your fan around 180 degrees to face into an open window.

So the fan should face outwards and shouldn't be blowing directly at you.

The idea is championed by New Zealand-based eco-design adviser Nelson Lebo, who apparently became aware of the trick when his grandmother would do it in the 1970s.

All you need is a fan and a window. Credit: LADbible
All you need is a fan and a window. Credit: LADbible
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He explained: "Everyone knows about cross-ventilation, but it only works when the wind is blowing and then it works best when there is a direct route for the wind to blow through a home.

"What the fan does is, it forces cross ventilation, even when the wind is not blowing. A fan will also pull air around corners, as in our home.

"The overall goal is to pull the warm air out while drawing cool air in once the outdoor temperature drops below the indoor temperature. Fans use hardly any power compared to AC."

Let's face it, having your fan facing outwards could actually help with the slight problem of dry eyes as well as drying out your throat and nose.

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Good sleep is everything. Credit: Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio
Good sleep is everything. Credit: Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio

As the Sleep Advisor website explains: "The constant stream of air also has a tendency to dry out your nasal passages, which could affect your sinuses.

"If the dryness is particularly extreme, it can result in your body producing excess mucus to try to compensate. Then, you're more susceptible to blockage, stuffiness, and sinus headaches."

The website continues: "People who sleep with a breeze directly on them may wake up with stiff or sore muscles. This is because the concentrated cool air can make muscles tense up and cramp.

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"This problem is especially common for people who sleep with it near their face and neck. If you've been waking up with a stiff neck in the morning, it might be because of the constant breeze."

Topics: Weather, Sleep, UK News

Anish Vij
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