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People are only just realising the x-rated dirty jokes in Shrek now that they're all grown up

Rhiannon Ingle

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People are only just realising the x-rated dirty jokes in Shrek now that they're all grown up

People are only just figuring out all the hidden x-rated humour in Shrek now they're rewatching it as adults.

The 2000s were effectively ruled by the Shrek franchise but, as obsessed as we all were, people clearly missed the more adult jokes not-so-carefully embedded into the films.

In the first Shrek, which hit our screens in 2001, a certain magic mirror dating-game show scene slips in a few sexual innuendos.

Drug references, sexual innuendos and much more all passed us by as kids. Credit: Dreamworks
Drug references, sexual innuendos and much more all passed us by as kids. Credit: Dreamworks

When introducing Lord Farquaad to an array of bachelorettes, the magic mirror states: "Although she lives with seven other men," referencing Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, "she's not easy," it adds.

Viewers can also see recreational drug-use references in Shrek the Third (2007) where Donkey exclaims, after switching bodies with Puss in Boots, "Man, I haven't been on a trip like that since college!"

In the same film, more drug references follow as Shrek and his entourage stumble into a medieval college.

The group walk past a van full of students just as one exits the vehicle in a cloud of smoke saying: "Bro, don't burn all my frankincense and myrrh," as a thinly-veiled reference to marijuana.

The first Shrek seems to definitely set the tone for these hidden in-jokes, namely with the use of song and verse. Credit: Dreamworks
The first Shrek seems to definitely set the tone for these hidden in-jokes, namely with the use of song and verse. Credit: Dreamworks

The first Shrek seems to definitely set the tone for these hidden in-jokes, namely with the use of song and verse.

Upon bumping into Robin Hood, Fiona and Shrek become audience members to an impromptu song and dance scene in which Hood reveals: "I like an honest fight and a saucy little maid."

His band of merry men/backup dancers then chorus: "What he's basically saying is he likes to get..." just before Hood interjects with "paid" instead of the assumed "laid".

Another joke of the sexual kind definitely that went over the heads of children but would have given any present adults a good giggle was Shrek's reference to Lord Farquaad's over-compensation.

After arriving at his castle, which was very large to note, Shrek asks Donkey: "Do you think maybe he's compensating for something?" before bursting out in a chuckle.

Fans find the realisation hilarious. Credit: Dreamworks
Fans find the realisation hilarious. Credit: Dreamworks

With certain content geared toward a more grown-up audience opposed to seemingly unaware children, fans of the popular franchise are utterly baffled they missed these jokes the first time around.

One YouTube user posted: "Shrek had so many jokes for adults because they knew they had to entertain the adults watching with their kids."

"The 'compensating for something' gag always baffled me," another admitted, "I remember asking my older cousin what this meant when we watched it together, only for her to sheepishly change the subject. Now I can understand why!"

A third chimed in, realising just how many laughs passed them by: "So many jokes flew over my head as a kid."

Featured Image Credit: Dreamworks

Topics: TV and Film

Rhiannon Ingle
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