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Robbie Williams Says He And His Family Have Nowhere To Live

Dominic Smithers

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Robbie Williams Says He And His Family Have Nowhere To Live

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

Robbie Williams says he and his family have nowhere to live.

The former Take That singer, 48, and his wife, Ayda Field, 42, are currently in the middle of a huge move.

They have sold all of their properties and are now searching for somewhere to settle down with their children, Theodora, nine, Charlton, seven, Colette, three, and Beau, two.

However, Robbie revealed this week that they still haven't found the right place.

Speaking to Australian radio hosts Kyle and Jackie O, he said: "We’re actually nowhere.

"We haven’t got an abode right now, we’ve pretty much sold everywhere, we don’t live anywhere and we’re trying to figure it out.

"The four kids are constantly a Rubix Cube puzzle that we’re trying to sort out because if they are schooled then they don’t see me because I’m all over the place and if they are home-schooled then they have another set of things that are a problem."

Robbie and wife Ayda are house hunting. Credit: Alamy
Robbie and wife Ayda are house hunting. Credit: Alamy

And when the question around rumours that Drake had bought one of his houses, Robbie joked that if it were true, he would have signed a non-disclosure agreement with 'any Canadians' involved, and so wouldn't be able to talk about it.

Once upon a time, when he wasn't a dad-of-four, Robbie was one of the biggest popstars on the planet.

Having become a global icon in the 90s, he eventually went his own way, selling millions of albums as a solo singer.

But it wasn't all fun and games; earlier year, he revealed that his life was actually in danger at one point.

Speaking to the Mirror, Robbie said people were out to kill him - with £2,000 on his head.

"I’ve never, ever said this, but I had a contract put on me to kill me. I’ve never said that publicly before," he said.

"It went away. I have friends. That stuff is the unseen stuff that happens when you become famous."

He went on: "At one point in my life I was ridiculously famous, Michael Jackson-style famous.

The singer said last year that people were out to kill him at the height of his fame. Credit: Alamy
The singer said last year that people were out to kill him at the height of his fame. Credit: Alamy

"I became famous when I was 17, doing a boy band when I was 16, the boy band took off. When I was 21 I left and then I had a solo career, sold 80 million albums, held the record for the most tickets sold in a day for a tour and blah, blah, blah…"

The 'Angels' singer explained that the weight of expectation took its toll on him mentally.

Robbie said: "Extreme fame and extreme success meets with anxiety and depression and mental illness.

"There’s a few levels of fame and what it does to you. The first one is 'f**k'.

There’s a couple more I can’t remember but the fourth one is ­acceptance. You sort of rally against your privacy being taken away from you and you rally against it by trying to be normal, trying to be normal but also I’m gonna be small so people don’t beat you up. Like, ‘I’m a d**khead, don’t hurt me.’

"I want to go to the all the normal places I can’t go because people want to kill me. It takes a while to get to acceptance."

Topics: Robbie Williams, Music, UK News

Dominic Smithers
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