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Antiques Roadshow Guest Passes Out When He's Told Watch He Paid £265 For Is Worth £500k

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Antiques Roadshow Guest Passes Out When He's Told Watch He Paid £265 For Is Worth £500k

This is the heartwarming moment an air force veteran finds out a watch he bought $345.97 (around £265) forty-odd years ago is now worth a whopping $500,000 (£380,000) to $700,000 (£530,000).

Appearing on Antiques Roadshow, the owner of the Rolex Daytona explains that he bought it mail order through a military base exchange while he was serving in the forces, back in 1974.

The fancy pants watch is still like brand-new as the guy never got around to wearing it - because he felt it was too nice - so, the watch has been lying around in a safe deposit box and only occasionally brought out so he can give it a look over.

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Thanks to the fact it's never been worn, the watch comes with its original box and paperwork - there's even a sticker still on the back of it with a reference number.

And it's this reference number that gets the antique expert excited, because 6263 is something a special model and highly coveted amongst watch collectors.

Peter Planes from Luxe Auctioneers in Florida, told the man 'a watch like this, at auction, is worth about $400,000', which was enough to leave the vet reeling, before Planes added that because this particular watch was unworn it could fetch even more at auction - between $500,000 to $700,000 to be exact.

Credit: PBS
Credit: PBS
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The long-haired Rolex owner reacts by jokingly fainting and asking: "You gotta be s******* me."

Now, while this whole thing is pretty touching, it really can't compete with the time an expert knocked back some p*** thinking it was vintage sherry on the UK version of Antiques Roadshow.

Expert Andy McConnell inadvertently drank the 180-year-old urine after extracting it from a bottle using a syringe.

The bottle was brought on the show in 2016 after being found by a man named John who found it buried in the threshold of his house - glass expert Andy dated the bottle back to the 1800s and reckoned it was probably filled with old wine or port.

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However, he was later told by host Fiona Bruce: "Inside were these brass pins, all of these dating from the late 1840s and the liquid - urine, a tiny bit of alcohol and one human hair."

Credit: BBC
Credit: BBC

As the colour drained from Andy's face, she went on: "And a mysterious little creature called an ostracod, which is like a little cockle. So, what this was not a bottle of port or wine but a witches' bottle.

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"So, buried in the threshold of the house as a talisman against witchcraft, against curses, against misfortune coming into the home." Lovely.

Featured Image Credit: PBS

Claire Reid
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