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Pest expert shares evidence Asian hornets that 'chase for half a mile' are back in UK

Pest expert shares evidence Asian hornets that 'chase for half a mile' are back in UK

The owner of Kill and Cure Pest Control has revealed Asian hornets are back in UK

A pest expert has warned Asian hornets that 'chase for half a mile' are back in UK.

The highly venomous insects are be bigger than wasps and hail from east Asia, according to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).

They do not arrive in the UK naturally, which begs the question, how did they get here?

Well, the Natural History Museum say Asian hornets first ‘invaded’ France in 2004 after being brought by a cargo ship, with numerous sightings being reported throughout Western Europe.

And now, Stuart Halliday, owner of Kill and Cure Pest Control, has got actual evidence that they are back in the country.

A pest expert has warned Asian hornets that 'chase for half a mile' are back in UK.
Facebook/wearecossall

Stuart told The Sun: "Hornets will also chase you for half a mile and will also stay above water waiting for you for up to 30 minutes.

"That means if you dive into a pond to get away from them you need to be able to hold your breath for half an hour."

He also said Asian hornets produce up to seven times more venom than a wasp and are darker in colour.

While the hornets aren't deadly per say, the 42-year-old claims that their sting could be fatal if it doesn't react well with your body.

To protect yourself, he said: "If you're in your shed with one get into your house immediately.

"Shut the doors and windows straight away - they will look at ways to get inside to chase you.

"They also love pheromones - if you’ve got aftershave or perfume on and you suspect there's a nest near you they will follow your smell."

The highly venomous insects are be bigger than wasps and hail from east Asia, according to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).
Facebook/wearecossall

The insects are known to decimate local bee populations, which are vital for food production.

They also target hives – often waiting for the bees to leave to attack them.

Recalling the time he treated a hornets nest five years ago, Stuart said: "When I go out on these jobs I have to wear a real thick suit.

"I treated the nest and they attacked me. They would not get off no matter how hard I shook."

But generally, Asian hornets are not usually considered to be a danger to humans.

Professor Helen Roy, an ecologist at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, also told the Mirror: "The Asian Hornet is not generally aggressive, although the stings can be painful and a very small number of people might be allergic to the sting.”

Featured Image Credit: Facebook/wearecossall

Topics: UK News, Animals