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Stone-Carved Penis Found In Archaeological Dig Of Roman Site

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Stone-Carved Penis Found In Archaeological Dig Of Roman Site

A huge stone-carved penis was uncovered during an archaeological dig at a former Roman site.

The 11-inch willy, which came complete with an impressive line of ejaculate, was discovered in the town of Catterick, North Yorkshire.

Experts began work at the site back in 2013, with over 62,000 historical objects being excavated during the five-year dig.

The dig itself was part of plans to improve the A1, which runs around the town.

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As well as the bulging phallus, archaeologists also unearthed a number of other items, including a 2,000-year-old pistachio nut, the oldest ever found in the UK, brooches and incense burners.

The penis was first found in 2014, and over the past three years the Northern Archaeological Associates has been analysing it and other objects.

Credit: Northern Archaeological Associates
Credit: Northern Archaeological Associates

Highways England has also been working with infrastructure firm AECOM on the renovation project.

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Helen Maclean, of AECOM, said: "This brings to completion 17 years of integrated archaeological and engineering work on the A1.

"There have been some fantastic discoveries during the archaeological work, which have greatly enhanced our archaeological knowledge."

Speaking about the ancient pistachio nut, a Highways Agency spokesman said: "Pistachios were first brought to Italy by Vitellius, father of the Emperor, who served in the Levant in the late AD30s.

"It was not possible to tell if the nut had been imported from southern Iberia, the north African coast, Greece or the Near East.

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Credit: Northern Archaeological Associates
Credit: Northern Archaeological Associates

"However, its date of collection and deposition in the Trajanic period marks it as the earliest known evidence of pistachio consumption in Britain."

Last year, human remains from the Medieval period were uncovered during an archaeological dig.

The bones reportedly dated back to around 1300 and were found just outside South Leith Parish Church in Edinburgh.

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According to reports, previous research into the area found evidence of a medieval graveyard that extended across the road from the site, with 10 bodies already having been dug up and part of a cemetery wall found.

The find was made as planned work continued on extending the city's tramlines.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Speaking about the incredible discovery, local authority leader Cammy Day said she was gobsmacked.

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She said: "This is an extremely fascinating, essential part of the broader project to bring the tram to Newhaven, shedding some light on centuries of history here in Leith.

"It's crucial that we conserve the remains found here and a team of archaeologists are carrying out the painstaking job of doing this.

"What's more, further examination of the excavated graves will give us an invaluable glimpse into the lives of Leithers past."

Featured Image Credit: Northern Archaeological Associates

Topics: Funny, Archaeology, History

Dominic Smithers
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