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Expert Explains What Happens To Your Body If You Stay Indoors All Day

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Expert Explains What Happens To Your Body If You Stay Indoors All Day

An expert has explained what happens to your body when you stay inside all day.

Dr Jo Daniels, a clinical psychologist specialises in anxiety and fatigue during coronavirus and unsurprisingly she's got quite a lot of anecdotal evidence.

Speaking to Stylist Magazine, Dr Daniels said: "First of all, it's really normal to not want to go outside. At this time of year, we tend to move into hibernation mode. So it's reasonable to feel a pull to the indoors - especially when there's so much good stuff on Netflix."

Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels
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So naturally, going outside might not be the first thing you want to do, but although you might want to stay inside until the summer, mustering up the energy may be the best thing you can do.

She explained: "Mental health difficulties generally arise from not getting our basic needs met in one way or another. What we find is that if we stay inside for too long then we end up not having access to some of the things we need."

But it's not just your mind that could benefit from getting some fresh air.

Dr Daniels continued: "Exercise is crucial for both mental and physical wellbeing, as it helps us get rid of built-up tension and anxiety and also releases endorphins and makes us fitter to respond to infection."

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And meeting up with a mate for a socially distanced walk can have a multitude of benefits.

Dr Daniels continued: "We're not supposed to be socially socialising per se, but face-to-face contact is really important for wellbeing.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

"We're social animals, so we really need that. But what's key is that talking to people gives you perspective. The longer you spend inside the longer you have to focus on your own thoughts and your worries.

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"There's no distraction from that. It is a trap I think people fall into, as without perspective we might feel low, and the lower we feel the less likely we are to do things that make us feel good, and then we're more likely to spend more time on our own and focus even more on our own concerns."

But - as with most things - balance is key.

She added: "If we force these people to go outside then their mental health will actually become worse. I suppose right now it's about finding a balance between what is meaningful and what is safe.

"Going for a walk on your own might not be as stimulating but actually, it might feel safer and therefore more suitable."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Amelia Ward
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