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81% Of People Never Want To Go Back To Working 5 Days A Week In An Office Again

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81% Of People Never Want To Go Back To Working 5 Days A Week In An Office Again

A massive 81 percent of people don't want to go back into the office five days a week, with many backing the idea of a four-day working week or a combination of working from home and the workplace.

The survey, commissioned by the 4 Day Week Campaign, found that just 19 percent of people wanted to go to the workplace five days a week, while 55 percent want to see permanent changes made to how we work following the pandemic.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The poll quizzed 1,002 people living in the UK about their attitudes to working and found that a mixture of remote working and going into the workplace was the most popular choice with 32 percent of the votes.

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The idea of a four-day working week polled at 25 percent, while 23 percent of workers wanted to continue working from home where possible.

Joe Ryle, a campaigner with the 4 Day Week Campaign, said: "The world of work has changed forever because of the pandemic and there is absolutely no good reason why we should return back to the old and outdated ways of working.

"We're seeing more and more companies switch to a four-day working week and a hybrid-mix of remote and office working is popular too.

"With burnout, overwork and work-related mental health issues on the rise, it's essential that we build a world of work that is better than what we had going into the pandemic."

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Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The poll comes after the Governor of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey said he believed it was unlikely workers would ever return to their old ways of working once restrictions had been lifted.

Speaking on the BBC, he said: "I think there will be for many people more of a hybrid model of working at home and working in a place of work.

"I think we've already seen the retailing industry change quite dramatically in the last year and although I would expect some of it to change back, it won't entirely change back.

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"I would be very surprised if we went back to exactly as we were before Covid."

The optional initiative is open to all companies who wish to take part, with those opting in to the trial reportedly having costs covered at 100 percent for the first year, 50 percent for the second year and 33 percent for the third.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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Deputy Prime Minister, Pablo Iglesias, said in December that he would look into the proposal put forward by left-wing party, Más País.

Iñigo Errejón of Más País praised the move on Twitter, writing: "With the four-day work week (32 hours), we're launching into the real debate of our times. It's an idea whose time has come."

The plan comes following a study conducted by Trades Union Congress in 2019 which found that those in countries with shorter working weeks are more productive.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: UK News

Claire Reid
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