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Astronaut Shows What Happens When You Cry In Space

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Astronaut Shows What Happens When You Cry In Space

An astronaut has demonstrated what happens when you cry in space - so there's one less shower thought for you to puzzle over. Watch here:

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Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield said he's often asked what happens when you tear up in space - which is a touch surprising - so he decided to clear it up once and for all.

However, Chris said he can't cry on demand, so he squirted some water in his eye instead.

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Having wet his peeper - in the video which was shared back in 2013 - the astronaut commented: "So, just as if I started crying, my eye's full of tears. But you can see it just forms a ball on my eye.

"In fact, I can put more water in. And so if you keep crying, you just ended up with a bigger and bigger ball of water in your eye, until eventually it crosses across your nose and gets into your other eye, or evaporates, or maybe spreads over your cheek - or, you grab a towel and dry it up.

"So yes, I've gotten things in my eye, your eyes will definitely cry in space, but the big difference is tears don't fall."

By the end of the experiment Chris was more of a mess than I was after the shootout on Sunday. Credit: Canadian Space Agency/NASA
By the end of the experiment Chris was more of a mess than I was after the shootout on Sunday. Credit: Canadian Space Agency/NASA
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The reason tears don't fall in space is of course because of the absence of our old friend gravity.

However, astronauts grow used to weightlessness after spending a prolonged period of time in space, and European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti actually missed it once she was back on Earth.

She told LADbible: "A couple of months into the flight I couldn't remember anymore what it meant to walk.

"It just felt so alien to me the idea of walking, of feeling my own weight, of feeling of that weight on the soles of my feet. It was like, 'Wow, that must have been really weird'.

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"I do miss weightlessness. I found it very liberating - a feeling of effortlessness, freedom, lightness. I enjoyed it a lot."


Yeah, I can get how that would be good fun. However, the experience of re-entering the Earth's atmosphere as a 'flying ball of fire' sounds less appealing - but she enjoyed that too.

She explained: "Since we know exactly what's going to happen, we actually welcome all of that because it means that everything is working just as it's supposed to.

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"So you kind of live it as a really fun thing, you know, to be on a ride in the amusement park, I guess.

"As long as you see all these things happening in the way that you expected them, it's actually really fun."

Featured Image Credit: Canadian Space Agency/NASA

Topics: Science, Interesting, Community, astronaut, Weird, space

Jake Massey
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