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Dad Finds One Of World's Most Venomous Sea Creature In The Family Fish Tank

Dad Finds One Of World's Most Venomous Sea Creature In The Family Fish Tank

A family were shocked to find one of the world's most venomous sea creatures in the most unlikely of places: their fish tank.

Wesley Trevors, 32, spotted the deadly cone snail - a species known to have killed 30 people worldwide - hanging out at the bottom of his aquarium

After the dangerous discovery at the home he shares with his wife and six-year-old son, Trevors took a photo of it and posted it in a marine life forum.

People identified it as a cone snail, but after approaching zoos and sea life centres to take it away, Trevors said many refused to do so.

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The cone snail. Credit: The Sun/News Licensing
The cone snail. Credit: The Sun/News Licensing

The communications worker told The Sun: "It's also known as a cigarette snail because it takes the time you'd smoke one for you to die if it stung you.

"My son loves Disney so we got a clownfish in there like the main character from Finding Nemo.

"I saw this tiny little shell I didn't recognise. I took a picture of it and sent it to a marine life forum and they told it me it was a cone snail."

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Credit: The Sun/News Licensing
Credit: The Sun/News Licensing

Eventually, Trevors found someone to take it away and expert handlers transferred the juvenile snail to London Sea Life Centre.

Trevors, who is from Slough in Berkshire, added: "The last thing I put in a couple of months ago was a shrimp, so maybe it was hiding somewhere on that."

Credit: The Sun/News Licensing
Credit: The Sun/News Licensing
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Cone snails are typically found in tropical seas, but some have managed to adapt to milder waters - such as those in the Mediterranean.

National Geographic says that while cone snails look harmless, 'appearances can be deceiving'.

An informative video explains: "Four tubes jut out from its shell. The long one at the top is a siphon, which it uses to inhale water and detect prey.

"Its smaller ones on either side are its eye stalks, and in the middle, a deadly proboscis.

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"Concealed within the tip is a lethal weapon. A harpoon loaded with a neuro-toxic mix so complex there is no anti-venom to thwart it.

"It's armed with at least a hundred different toxins - more than any other creature."

Credit: The Sun/News Licensing
Credit: The Sun/News Licensing

It adds: "When some cone snails go hunting, they like to burrow into the sand and wait.

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"When a meal happens by, the cone snail fires its harpoon. The poisons quickly paralyse the fish.

"Once its prey is helpless, the cone snail retracts it through its proboscis until it engulfs the fish, swallowing it whole."

Featured Image Credit: The Sun/News Licensing

Topics: News, UK, Animals

Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at [email protected]