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Non-Korean Speaking Squid Game Viewers Missed Out On Heartbreaking Storyline

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Non-Korean Speaking Squid Game Viewers Missed Out On Heartbreaking Storyline

Netflix's Squid Game is probably the most talked-about show around at the moment and the dystopian South Korean series is currently the number one trending show on the platform.

But fanatic fans have been left stunned after realising they have potentially missed an important storyline due to the English subtitles.

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Warning - Spoilers Ahead

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Korean-speaking fans have noticed something strange about one of the show's leading characters, Sae Byeok's accent, played by Jung Ho-Yeon.

They noticed how the character, a North Korean defector who is desperate to win the prize money in order to get her mother safely to the south, switches her accent up in different situations.

Sae Byeok, played by Jung Ho-Yeon. Credit: Netflix
Sae Byeok, played by Jung Ho-Yeon. Credit: Netflix

One fan explained on Twitter: "In the scene where Sae Byeok talks to her younger brother, she initially talks in the standard Seoul dialect, but immediately switches to the North Korean accent when her brother starts becoming distressed."

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Another Korean viewer commented: "When everyone watching with me I was like 'why doesn't everyone know she's North Korean?'

"We can hear it."

"I watched it with my bf who's Korean and he pointed out Sae Byeok has a North Korean accent, but non-Korean viewers would have no clue!" a third user wrote.

"That's pretty awesome that the change of accent showed she was different in the show," responded another viewer.

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Credit: Netflix
Credit: Netflix

Some viewers have also picked up on how the character was viewed differently to some of her competitors due to her hailing from North Korea.

They pointed out how the character's North Korean accent made her shine in a different light to her South Korean competitors.

Another user wrote: "One thing I found kind of interesting was how Sae Byeok was treated by some of the other players for being North Korean."

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Writer Grace Kim wrote on Nextshark: "While most of what he says doesn't represent the average Korean with basic human decency, it does speak some truth to the discrimination faced by defectors in South Korean society.

"North Korean defectors in most cases are protected as citizens in South Korea due to the countries' shared origins, but 70 years of separation have made them almost entirely foreign to one another."

Credit: Netflix
Credit: Netflix

For those unaware, the premise for the South Korean series is pretty straightforward - 456 players who are in major financial ruin compete against one other in a selection of deadly children's games for a prize of 45.6 billion won - roughly around £23.2 million.

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If you don't win or decide that you want to leave the competition, well, you can probably guess what happens.

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

Topics: TV and Film, Netflix, Squid Game

Anish Vij
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