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Woman Faints After Dropping £34,000 Bracelet

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Woman Faints After Dropping £34,000 Bracelet

A tourist in China fainted after accidentally breaking a bracelet worth 300,000 yuan (£34,000).

The woman was visiting a jade market in Ruili City in south western China's Yunnan province on 27th June when she accidentally dropped the jewellery while trying it on.

Watch the moment she fainted upon learning the price of the bling here:

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Credit: Asia Wire

The jade bracelet snapped in half after it slipped out of her hand, reports the People's Daily Online.

Jade is a luxury product in China as it is seen as representing purity and having the ability to ward off evil and even to bring long life.

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Credit: Asia Wire

Following the smash, the shop's owner told her that the bracelet was worth 300,000 yuan (£34,000).

She passed out in shock and had to be placed on the ground by family members in order to recover. That's similar to how we react when we get the bill at Nando's.

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Credit: Asia Wire

According to witnesses, the family offered the seller 70,000 yuan (£8,000) in damages but he said that it was not enough for them to break even on the product.

In order to settle the claim, the bracelet was valued by an independent expert to cost around 180,000 yuan (£20,700). The family agreed to pay the owner this sum of money.

The price of jade has been soaring in recent years due to its popularity in China, Forbes reports.

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Jade is actually not a single compound, but the name for two chemically different substances that are physically similar. Jadeite, which comes exclusively from Burma, is the most expensive of the two. But nephrite, which traditionally comes from western China, was in use long before jadeite became popular.

If you're wondering how much it can fetch, Bonhams auction house in Hong Kong recently sold a collection of historical jade items for $23million (£17m), dating from the Neolithic period.

"In my experience, nobody treats Chinese archaic jade as an investment vehicle. It's a highly specialised, highly scholarly, very narrow sector of the collectors' market," said Colin Sheaf, the head of Asian art at Bonhams.

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It is prized for its aesthetic qualities as well as its price, meaning it serves as a status symbol.

Featured Image Credit: Asia Wire

Topics: Asia

James Dawson
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