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Italian Villages Offering Millennials €28,000 To Move There

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Italian Villages Offering Millennials €28,000 To Move There

On Sunday, Italy were crowned champions of Europe after a dramatic Euro 2020 final - sending England plummeting into a state of national mourning.

But if we can't beat them, then perhaps we should join them.

Some picturesque villages in the country are actively encouraging people to move there by offering up €28,000 (£24,000/$33,000) incentives.

So, what's the catch? Well, 'What are the catches?' would be a better question.

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Bova is one of the villages taking part. Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Luca Galli
Bova is one of the villages taking part. Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Luca Galli

First of all, applicants can be no older than 40. Secondly, they must either work in a specific profession required in the area or set up a new business.

The villages are dotted across the southern region of Calabria, which is located in the toe of the boot that is Italy (the country is shaped like a boot, in case you've never noticed).

The weather is always warm and often hot in the region, and the stunning scenery features mountains and coastline.

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However, villages in the area have been hit by depopulation, and many barely have 2,000 residents.

It is hoped this incentive can help to breathe new life into these deserted villages, which hordes of young people have left over the years in pursuit of towns and cities, where there are more opportunities.

Regional councillor Gianluca Gallo said the money could be paid in monthly instalments in the range of €1,000 to €800 over two to three years, or in a one-off lump sum to support the launch of a new business.

You could be paid to move to the village of Sant'Agata del Bianco. Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Vi90
You could be paid to move to the village of Sant'Agata del Bianco. Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Vi90
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He told CNN: "We're honing the technical details, the exact monthly amount and duration of the funds, and whether to include also slightly larger villages with up to 3,000 residents.

"We've had so far a huge interest from villages and hopefully, if this first scheme works, more are likely to follow in coming years.

"We want this to be an experiment of social inclusion. Draw people to live in the region, enjoy the settings, spruce up unused town locations such as conference halls and convents with high-speed internet.

"Uncertain tourism and the one euro houses are not the best ways to revamp Italy's south."

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The one euro houses he mentioned have been deployed across depopulated areas of Europe.

Last year, in nearby Campania, 90 properties were put on the market for a euro.

As you might expect with that price tag, these homes did not offer luxurious living - quite the opposite in fact. The houses are dilapidated and communities are dying, due to a combination of emigration and a series of severe earthquakes, with the most recent one striking in 1980.

In return for the bargain house, it was expected that buyers would renovate the building before moving in.

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You can keep up with the latest initiative in Calabria on the region's website here.

Featured Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Passiflora41

Topics: World News, Interesting, Italy

Jake Massey
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