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France To Ban Use Of Wild Animals In Travelling Circuses And Marine Parks

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France To Ban Use Of Wild Animals In Travelling Circuses And Marine Parks

France is set to ban the use of wild animals in circuses and animal parks as part of a gradual ban that will take effect over the coming years.

The French environment minister Barbara Pompili announced that it is time for the country to 'open a new era', without captive animals being used for entertainment.

On top of that, the French government will also ban the raising of mink on fur farms, which is good news for the UK government, which is considering a ban on the import of animal fur after Brexit is completed.

Pompili said that keeping captive tigers, elephants, lions, bears and other wild animals in travelling circuses will be outlawed 'in the coming years', and the three marine parks in France will no longer be able to bring dolphins and killer whales into the country or breed them.

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Mink farming, where the animals are kept in captivity before being killed for their fur, will also be phased out over the next five years.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

In a statement declaring animal welfare as a priority for the government, Pompili said: "It is time to open a new era in our relationship with these animals."

She added: "It is time that our ancestral fascination with these wild beings no longer means they end up in captivity."

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The ban does not apply to animals in zoos or other permanent shows, but represents a big step for animal welfare in France.

As for the timeframe in place, the government has yet to outline a definitive date, but Pompili said that the process must begin 'as soon as possible' and that decisions on what to do with the animals will be decided 'on a case by case basis'.

As for the human cost of this initiative, the government has pledged eight million Euros (£7.3m) to help those involved in the businesses affected find other jobs.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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Pompili continued: "That transition will be spread over several years, because it will change the lives of many people."

Animal rights group PETA described the decision as 'an historic victory'.

The group tweeted: "Champagne bottles are being uncorked here. Thank you to all those who have helped bring this about."

The process is expected to take 'seven to 10 years to prepare a future' for the creatures that are currently in captivity.

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It is not yet known what this means for entertainment venues that stage shows involving birds of prey.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: World News, France, Animals

Tom Wood
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