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Fake Vodka That Can Cause 'Blindness Or Death' Found In Hull

Fake Vodka That Can Cause 'Blindness Or Death' Found In Hull

Hull City Council have sent out a warning about a type of vodka that has been found on sale that could cause 'blindness or death'.

Drinkers in the Yorkshire city have been warned against buying a particular brand of vodka called Radanoff.

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Bottles of the fake vodka brand have been discovered for sale and the authorities believe that it could contain industrial strength alcohol that could be dangerous if consumed.

The council claims that drinking the vodka could cause serious harm, including blindness or even death.

The 'Radanoff' vodka seized in Hull. Credit: Hull CC News/Twitter
The 'Radanoff' vodka seized in Hull. Credit: Hull CC News/Twitter

They have also noticed that the Radanoff vodka bottles that they have seized do not have a custom duty stamp - indicating that a tax was paid when the product came into the UK from abroad - and that the barcode on the bottles doesn't link to an actual product.

The Hull local authority tweeted: "Warning: If you spot 'Radanoff' vodka for sale, do not buy or drink it. Radanoff is a fake brand seized recently in Hull.

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"It could contain industrial alcohol which can cause blindness or death. If you see Radanoff, contact Trading Standards on 01482 300 300."

The statement continued: "Tests are still to be carried out on the bottles seized - until those are complete there's no way of knowing what's in the bottles.

"However, we do know this product has no customs duty stamp and the barcode doesn't link to a real product."

Fake alcohol in the UK is an expensive business. It is thought that alcohol fraud costs the country around £1bn each year. That is because the traders don't pay tax on it, therefore they are undercutting legit alcohol companies.

Oh, and it's really dangerous too. Ingredients that have been found to have been used in fake booze include anti-freeze and car windscreen wash.

If you want to recognise fake alcohol, it's usually pretty easy. Dodgy labels, unsealed caps, spelling mistakes, prices that are too low to be true. These are all tell-tale signs that it's not the real deal.

If the bottles seem to be the same brand, but aren't filled to the same level, that's another giveaway.

Bottles of fake alcohol. Credit: LGA
Bottles of fake alcohol. Credit: LGA

Councillor Morris Bright, the Vice Chairman of the LGA (Local Government Association) Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: "It's appalling that rogue traders selling illegal alcohol are willing to play roulette with the health and well-being of their customers by prioritising quick profits above safety.

"We want people to enjoy their New Year's Eve celebrations, but anyone buying alcohol needs to look out for signs it could be fake because it could leave them seriously ill and, in extreme cases, cost them their life.

"People are advised to only buy alcohol from reputable outlets and be wary of any items being sold at suspiciously cheap prices, as they could be counterfeit."

If you think you might have consumed fake alcohol, you should get some medical advice and report the incident to an environmental health officer.

You can do that by calling Citizens Advice on 03454 04 05 06, or the Customs Hotline on 0800 59 5000.

Featured Image Credit: LGA/Hull CC News/Twitter

Topics: uk news, News, Alcohol

Tom Wood

Tom Wood is a freelance journalist and LADbible contributor. He graduated from University of London with a BA in Philosophy before studying for a Masters in Journalism at the University of Salford. He has previously written for the M.E.N Group as well as working for several top professional sports clubs. Contact him on [email protected]

 

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