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Man Plans Return To Cambodian Jungle To Investigate MH370 Crash Conspiracy

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Man Plans Return To Cambodian Jungle To Investigate MH370 Crash Conspiracy

An amateur detective says he plans to return to the Cambodian jungle to investigate what he believes could be the crash site of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 (MH370).

The plane went missing on 8 March 2014 while flying from Kuala Lumpar to Beijing and all 227 passengers and 12 crew members are presumed dead - with the disappearance considered one of the most mysterious in aviation history.

In 2018, brothers Jackie and Ian Wilson attempted to visit a site in the jungles of Cambodia which they believed could be the crash site. Ian developed the theory after stumbling across a plane-like shape on Google Maps - an app he uses frequently in his work as a video producer.

The Wilsons think this could be the MH370 crash site. Credit: Google Maps
The Wilsons think this could be the MH370 crash site. Credit: Google Maps
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The brothers had to abandon their last discovery mission due to dangerous conditions, but when asked whether he would be returning for 'round two' on Instagram, Jackie replied: "Definitely."

According to the Daily Star, Google say the mysterious figure is actually a plane that was captured in flight. What's more, debris has been discovered in the Indian Ocean which is thought to have come from the aircraft, casting further doubt over the Wilsons' theory.

However, it seems the pair are still keen to get to the bottom of the Google Maps mystery.

Speaking to the Daily Star in November, Ian said: "It was so dangerous, every time we came to a river, where the waterfall would be crossing, it might only be 10 metres the other side but you've got no idea how deep it is, it's about a foot deep and it goes up past your thighs.

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"Then you're getting brushed away and just thinking, 'I've got to come back this way,' then you're climbing over fallen rocks, crawling across them in the end.

"We should have been badly injured, but the guides were good, they would go across first, and pull us up.

"I would love to go again but it's just money. I had a weird seizure the day after I came there, I thought I was having a stroke, all jittery and my heart was going, probably really bad dehydration.

"I hope to go again, months after I was like, 'I'm up for going again', definitely want to do this again but it's just the money."

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Debris believed to be from the plane was found in the Indian Ocean in 2017. Credit: PA
Debris believed to be from the plane was found in the Indian Ocean in 2017. Credit: PA

There are plenty of theories about what might have happened, but there's been no concrete evidence that can conclusively say one way or the other.

A panel of aviation experts came together on Australia's 60 Minutes to discuss how the plane may have disappeared, with opinion divided as to whether the plane ran out of fuel or was deliberately plunged into the ocean.

Featured Image Credit: Laurent ERRERA/Creative Commons

Topics: Crash, Interesting, Community, Conspiracy

Jake Massey
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