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​Man Miraculously Survived Execution By Firing Squad

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​Man Miraculously Survived Execution By Firing Squad

A man in Mexico miraculously survived execution by firing squad after being shot 8-9 times - amazingly living for another 60 years until the ripe old age of 85.

Wenseslao Moguel was captured by authorities in 1915 after being suspected of taking part in the Mexican Revolution, and was sentenced to death without a trial.

During the execution on 18 March 1915, Moguel not only made it through the shots from the firing squad without dying, he also survived the 'coup de grace' - a shot to the head delivered by the squad's commander to ensure death.

According to Ripley's Believe It Or Not! - a franchise set up by cartoonist and adventurer Robert Ripley, which is still in operation today - Moguel was in 'excruciating pain' but was still alive, and waited for his executioners to leave before making his way to safety.

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Wenseslao Moguel, circa 1940. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Wenseslao Moguel, circa 1940. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

He was severely disfigured, but went on to 'live a full life' before passing away on 29 July 1976, having become something of a legend after appearing on Ripley's 1937 radio show and at his Odditorium in Cleveland, Ohio.

The Ripley's Believe It Or Not! website explains: "Pancho Villa was one of the most famous leaders of the Mexican Revolution. After his defeat by the Constitutionalists in 1915, Northern rebels faced harsh punishment by regional de facto armies. One of the unfortunate casualties of war was Wenseslao Moguel. Branded as a traitor, Wenseslao was sentenced-without trial-to execution by firing squad.

The Mexican Revolution in 1913. Credit: PA
The Mexican Revolution in 1913. Credit: PA
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"During the Mexican Revolution, a firing squad was the preferred means of execution. The squad was comprised of 9 soldiers who would all fire their weapons at the same time. The tenth shooter, an officer, was to aim at one of the prisoner's vital organs and deliver the coup de grace-the kill shot.

"This was Wenseslao's lucky day. March 18, 1915. The Federales took their positions and fired-even the tenth. Assuming he was dead, the job was done, or so they thought. Wenseslao survived! Although in excruciating pain, he waited for his executioners to leave and, miraculously, left the scene to make his way to safety."

From his unexpected fame, Moguel was dubbed 'El Fusilado', or 'The Executed One' - a nickname that inspired a 2008 song by none other than Chumbawamba.

Featured Image Credit: Ripley's Believe It Or Not!

Topics: World News, News, History, Mexico

Jess Hardiman
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