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Gardener Digs Up More Than Weeds After Discovering 7000-Year-Old Neolithic 'Family'

Gardener Digs Up More Than Weeds After Discovering 7000-Year-Old Neolithic 'Family'

A gardener and his son digging a compost pit have unearthed more than they bargained for, after discovering the grave of a Neolithic 'family' dating back 7,000 years.

Alexey Agoshkov, from Zelenkhoz village in the Russian region of Buryatia, was digging with his son Ivan when they made the incredible discovery - which has excited archaeologists from all over the country.

Credit: East2West News
Credit: East2West News

As the pictures show, the pair have uncovered two adults lying on their sides, with bent legs and a child between them.

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One of the adults has a white stone ring on her skull and the remnants of shell bracelets on both wrists.

The other is clutching a bone needle holder in the left hand, with three chalcedony microplates near the sacrum (the bone located above the tailbone).

Explaining how he found the skeletons, Alexey said: "I was digging a compost pit with my son... when suddenly a bone, a joint jumped out.

"I carefully cleared the top of the burial and saw an adult's skull first, then the child, then the second adult."

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Credit: East2West News
Credit: East2West News

The father is experienced in discovering remains, according to local reports, having previously searched for World War Two graves in western Russia, and so was able to unearth the full remains with some help from his son.

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"I got so surprised when we found the first bone," said Ivan. "[I said:] 'Wow, a human.'

"I went straight to mum. She didn't believe me at first - and didn't even want to look."

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Credit: East2West News
Credit: East2West News

What's even more exciting is that this discovery may be the first of many in the area.

Russian archaeologists believe the site may be part of a larger graveyard, which could belong to one of the world's oldest settlements near the modern day city Ulan-Ude, itself founded in 1666.

If so, it would be 'simply amazing', according to Dr Prokopy Konovalov, who has been working at the site.

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In order to ascertain more information, work is now underway to determine the age, gender and race of the three ancient people.

Researchers also will seek to confirm that the skeletons are indeed a family, comprising of a man, woman and child.

The cause of death is also not clear although there are no obvious signs of wounds.

One thing does seem clear: for gardener Alexey and his son, exploring their local village just became a lot more interesting.

Featured Image Credit: East2West News

Topics: World News, Russia